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    Drew University
   
 
  Sep 22, 2017
 
 
    
2016-2017 Caspersen School of Graduate Studies [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Graduate Regulations


Graduate Regulations


A Statement of Character

The Caspersen School is an integral part of Drew University. The concept of a university derives from “universe,” which implies a turning around one point. The image may be that of a wheel and its hub. The universe of our discourse centers upon a deep, close inquiry into the inmost nature of human understanding and creativity. Often expressed in literature or history, sometimes expressed in spirituality or the arts, our inquiry is basically interdisciplinary. In a shorthand manner we speak of our being devoted to advanced studies in aspects of the Humanities.

Once characterized as “the greatest of all keys to the history, mind and thoughts of civilization,” the Humanities are identified in the Caspersen School by reference to interdisciplinary inquiry. In this way we are free to engage in open discourse as a small community of scholars some of whose fields are too often divorced from the Humanities per se. Thus, we do seek to define the Humanities by appeal not to exclusion but to inclusion. What the hub of our inquiry includes, we welcome.

In another sense we practice inclusion by inviting into the Caspersen School students and faculty of widely diverging points of view. We respect diversity not as virtuous in and of itself but as essential to the unfolding of our common task, for the hub of our experience is both an idea and a task.

We are dedicated to providing graduate education of world class quality. Therefore our admissions policy is highly selective. We seek talented students from many nations who are knowledgeable about their convictions, creative and self-disciplined, and who relish the opportunity for untrammeled intellectual adventure.

We look upon our common task as both descriptive and therapeutic. We are constantly concerned with facts without neglecting the pursuit of meaning in a global context. We revere knowledge for its own sake, yet our mission leads us to the pursuit of wisdom and the common good.

I. Degree Courses of Study and Requirements

A. The Master of Arts (M.A.) degree is designed for students who will devote not less than one year of full-time study beyond the baccalaureate degree in a specific academic area and will write a master’s thesis. The requirements are:

  • Completion of nine courses with a grade average of 3.0 or better
  • A research tutorial paper of publishable quality of about 40 pages of scholarly research.
  • A successful demonstration of a scholar’s reading competence in one approved foreign language, if necessary for the student’s program.

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is designed for students who, by ability and aim, will pursue prolonged intellectual activity that advances specific scholarly disciplines. Requirements for the Ph.D. degree are met by completing at least three years of full-time study, the first two of which are spent in course work completed by a series of capstone essays. The third year is spent in dissertation research, preparation and writing. The requirements are:

  • Completion of two years of courses (12 courses) with a grade average of at least 3.1.
  • Demonstration of a scholar’s reading competence in the foreign languages if required by the student’s program of studies.
  • Completion of the capstone essays.
  • Completion of two semesters of dissertation research (18 credits), and an approved scholarly dissertation and its oral defense.

A Terminal Master of Arts (M.A.) degree may be conferred in all Areas if, in the judgment of the Committee on Academic Standing, a student’s doctoral candidacy is no longer sustainable.

  • The student’s Area may recommend to the Committee on Academic Standing that the student be given terminal M.A. status.
  • The Committee on Academic Standing may initiate the action itself in consultation with the Area and the student involved.
  • The student may request the Area to recommend the action.
  • The requirements of the terminal M.A. shall be those of an M.A. above. The conditions may be modified at the discretion of the Area with the approval of the Committee on Academic Standing. Students given terminal M.A. status and/or receiving a terminal M.A. shall not be eligible to reapply for admission to a Ph.D. program in the Caspersen School.​​

The Certificate in Conflict Resolution and Leadership (C.R.L.) is designed for students who want to explore the issues surrounding Conflict Resolution and improve their professional understanding of such issues.

  • The certificate can be obtained on it’s own, or as a part of the M.Litt. and D.Litt. degrees.
  • Students enrolled in the Certificate in Conflict Resolution and Leadership are required to take a total of 5 courses (15 credits) including a supervised internship and 3 required core courses: Introduction to C.R.L. Methods and Practicum; Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies; Cross Cultural Approaches to Understanding Conflict. 
  • A range of elective courses and internship opportunities allow students to gain expertise and experience in a particular area of their choice. `
  • Students interested in receiving the Certificate in Conflict Resolution and Leadership in addition to their M.Litt/D.Litt may transfer up to 6 credits from M.Litt/D.Litt coursework into the certificate program.
  • Courses must be listed as Conflict Resolution courses (ARCR). Conflict Resolution and Leadership courses can be counted toward the Global Studies concentration in the D.Litt.
  • Individuals interested in the Conflict Resolution and Leadership certificate should fill out the Conflict Resolution & Leadership  application.
  • Current Arts and Letters students must apply separately to the Conflict Resolution and Leadership certificate. In lieu of the Online Application, please fill out the Caspersen Student/Alumni Petition form.

The Master of Letters (M.Litt.) degree is designed for students who wish to engage in sophisticated, graduate-level exploration of the humanities. There are two different ways to earn the degree:

  • The completion of 10 courses (30 credits) with a grade average of 3.0 or better. One of the 10 courses is directed study leading to the submission of a master’s thesis that must conform to the guidelines for the master’s thesis. Theses are generally 50-75 pages of scholarly research.
    Note: Any students considering application to the Doctor of Letters program are strongly encouraged to write the thesis.
  • The completion of 11 courses (33 credits) with a grade average of 3.0 or better without the master’s thesis.
  • Please note that courses taken at other institutions cannot be counted toward the M.Litt. degree. Courses in one area not cross listed in Arts and Letters also may not be taken for credit toward the degree, unless prior approval is received from the Area.
  • All requirements for the M.Litt. degree must be fulfilled within a period of two years after the student satisfactorily completes 27 hours of work in the program.

 

The Doctor of Letters (D.Litt.) degree is designed for students who wish to engage in sophisticated, graduate-level exploration of the humanities at the doctoral level.

  • Students who began in the program BEFORE JUNE 2012 must complete a total of thirty-nine (39) credits for graduation:
  • Nine elective courses (27 credits)
    Students are required to elect one of eight concentrations (Historical Studies, Literary Studies, Studies in Spirituality, Writing, Fine Arts and Media, Irish/Irish-American Studies, and Teaching in the Two Year College) offered in the Arts and Letters Programs. To complete the concentration, students need to take at least four courses (12 credits) in their chosen series. Students who have been admitted to the D.Litt. with additional credit requirements must complete them prior to beginning work on the dissertation.
  • The Joy of Scholarly Writing: Beginning the Dissertation Process (3 credits)
    Note: If “The Joy of Scholarly Writing” has been taken while in the M.Litt. program, the student should consult with the Director as to an appropriate replacement writing course.
  • Doctoral dissertation (9 credits)
     

Students who began in the program AFTER JUNE 2012 must complete a total of forty-five (45) credits for graduation:

  • Ten elective courses (30 credits)
  • Liberal Studies: What They Are, What They Do
    This ungraded (S/U) seminar should be taken in the first year of coursework. This course is offered each semester only on Tuesday evenings, 7:00-9:30 pm.
  • Ten elective courses (30 credits)
  • Students are required to elect one of eight concentrations (Historical Studies, Literary Studies, Studies in Spirituality, Writing, Fine Arts and Media, Irish/Irish-American Studies, and Teaching in the Two Year College) offered in the Arts and Letters Programs. To complete the concentration, students need to take at least four courses (12 credits) in their chosen series. Students who have been admitted to the D.Litt. with additional credit requirements must complete them prior to beginning work on the dissertation.
  • The Joy of Scholarly Writing: Beginning the Dissertation Process (3 credits)
    Note: If “The Joy of Scholarly Writing” has been taken while in the M.Litt. program, the student should consult with the Director as to an appropriate replacement writing course.
  • Doctoral dissertation (9 credits)
  • Please note that courses taken at other institutions normally cannot be counted toward the D.Litt. degree. Courses in one area not cross listed in Arts and Letters also may not be taken for credit toward the degree, unless prior approval is received from the Area.
  • All requirements for the D.Litt. degree must be fulfilled within a period of five years after the student satisfactorily completes either: a) 30 hours of work in the program for students entering after June 2001, or b) 36 hours of work in the program for students entering after June 2012.

The Certificate of Medical Humanities (C.M.H.)

  • The certificate is awarded upon successful completion of 15 academic credit hours (five courses) with a minimum cumulative average of B (3.0 GPA) or higher. Courses taken at other institutions cannot be counted toward the C.M.H.
  • Students must take, as part of their five courses, the following three: Bio-Medical Ethics; Medical Narrative; and the Clinical Practicum (which is normally a two semester long experience). Please note that Bio-Medical Ethics and Medical Narrative are prerequisites to the Clinical Practicum.
  • All requirements for the C.M.H. must be completed within a period of two years after the student matriculates unless exceptional circumstances can be proven and an extension is granted by the Caspersen School.
  • Courses in one area not cross listed in Medical Humanities may not be taken for credit toward the degree without prior approval of the Area.

The Master of Medical Humanities (M.M.H.)

The master’s degree is awarded upon successful completion of 30 credit hours total with a minimum cumulative average of B (3.0 GPA) or higher under the following conditions:

  • Students who do not hold the C.M.H. or its equivalent from a recognized institution may apply directly to the master’s program and take the certificate incidental to their course of study after completion of the above certificate requirements, in which case the overall degree program would consist of 10 courses, including the following four that are required: Bio-Medical Ethics, Medical Narrative, the Clinical Practicum (which may be a two semester long experience), and Thesis. Please note that Bio-Medical Ethics and Medical Narrative are prerequisites to the Clinical Practicum/Internship, which similarly is a prerequisite to Thesis. All other courses may be chosen as electives in order to tailor the program to an individual’s experience and interests.
  • Students who already hold the C.M.H. or its equivalent from a recognized institution may be granted advanced standing for the master’s degree of no more than five courses. Applicants to the master’s program who have completed a certificate program elsewhere than at Drew must petition the Academic Standing Committee for advanced standing. Academic performance and curricular compatibility will be reviewed before such advanced standing is approved. Occasionally, students may be admitted to the master’s program with the requirement that they take one or more of the three required courses for the Drew C.M.H. if their prior preparation is not considered adequate in a particular subject area.
  • Courses in one area not cross listed in Medical Humanities may not be taken for credit toward the degree without prior approval of the Area.
  • All requirements for the M.M.H. degree must be completed within a period of five years after the student matriculates unless exceptional circumstances are proven and an extension is granted by the Caspersen School.

The Doctor of Medical Humanities (D.M.H.)

The doctoral degree is awarded upon successful completion of 45 credit hours with a minimum cumulative average of 3.1 GPA or higher under the following conditions:

  • Students are required to take twelve courses (36 credits), including the following four that are required: Introduction to Medical Humanities and Humanism, Biomedical Ethics, Medical Narrative, and the Clinical Practicum (which may be a two semester long experience). Please note that BioMedical Ethics and Introduction to Medical Narrative and Medical Anthropology are prerequisites to the Clinical Practicum, which similarly is a prerequisite to Dissertation Preparation. All other courses may be chosen as electives in order to tailor the program to an individual’s experience and interests. Students who have already taken the required courses in the C.M.H. or M.M.H. may fill out their program with appropriate electives.
  • The Joy of Scholarly Writing: Beginning the Dissertation Process (3 credits)
  • Doctoral dissertation (9 credits)
  • Courses in one area not cross listed in Medical Humanities may not be taken for credit toward the degree with prior approval of the Area Convenor.
  • All requirements for the D.M.H. degree must be completed within a period of seven years after the student matriculates unless exceptional circumstances are proven and an extension is granted by the Caspersen School.

The Master of Fine Arts in Poetry and Poetry in Translation (M.F.A.)

The MFA in Poetry

  • Requires the completion of four semesters and five residencies for a total of 64 credits. Students study the craft of poetry by writing poems, studying craft, reading extensively, and writing critically. During the fourth and final semester students complete a manuscript of original poems

The MFA in Poetry in Translation

  • This program is designed to teach students about the different models and schools of translation. Students receiving the MFA in Translation will translate into English. They will be expected to attend all lectures at the residency in order to understand the craft elements involved in writing poetry in English. The degree requires the completion of four semesters and five residencies for a total of 64 credits. During the fourth semester students complete a manuscript of translations.

The Combined MFA in Poetry and Poetry in Translation

  • This program is designed for poets who also want to study the art of translation. To attain the combined MFA, students pursue their own writing at the same time that they study and practice translation. The combined degree requires that students complete five semesters and six residencies for a total of 80 credits. During the fourth semester students complete a manuscript of their own poems. During the fifth semester students complete a manuscript of translations.

 

The Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.):
This program leads to an M.A.T. degree and provisional teaching certification in biology, chemistry, English, French, Italian, math, physics, Spanish, social studies, music, art, or theater arts.  The M.A.T. offers two scheduling options. Our one-year, full-time track normally begins in May and ends the following May. Full-time study is required for all students during the final semester of student teaching.

II. Programs

Areas of study: Arts and Letters (M.Litt., D.Litt.); History and Culture (M.A., Ph.D.); Medical Humanities (Certificate, M.M.H., D.M.H.);  Poetry and Poetry in Translation (M.F.A.); Teaching (M.A.T.) and the Certificate in Conflict Resolution and Leadership (C.R.L.).

New Programs for graduate study should originate in the discipline or disciplines concerned, before the Graduate Faculty, upon the recommendation of its Dean’s Council, takes final action to approve or disapprove the proposed program. Final approval for a new academic program always rests with the president and the Board of Trustees.

III. Admission of Students

Annually in the fall the Deans in consultation with the VP for Enrollment Management along with the advice of the Dean’s Council will determine how many students should be admitted to each program. The Council will be guided by:

  • The recommendation of the Faculty in each Area as submitted to the Dean’s Council.
  • The judgment of the Dean’s Council as to where each program stands in its development toward some optimum condition. It might be desirable, for example, to encourage the growth of some programs while holding or even reducing others.
  • Notification
    All applicants whose folders are complete by the programs admission application deadline shall be assured of prompt notification. Financial Aid and Scholarship decisions should be made to coincide with the letters of notification as closely as possible.
  • Language
    All international applicants and non-native speakers of English must submit TOEFL and TWE scores. Applicants must achieve a score of 585 on the TOEFL.
  • Unclassified admission
    “Special or Unclassified student status” refers to a non-matriculated student who may enroll in up to two courses, paying fees and tuition. (Special refers to Arts & Letters and Medical Humanities courses, and Unclassified refers to M.A./Ph.D. courses.) The student is required to complete all of the course requirements and will be awarded a grade and a transcript for graduate credit. Special or Unclassified student status does not imply admission to the Caspersen School. Students must apply through the Admissions Office to be granted admission to Special or Unclassified status. Should they wish to matriculate in the future, they are required to apply to the degree program just as any other applicant would. If a Special or Unclassified student is admitted to a matriculated program, there is no guarantee of advanced standing for credits previously earned to count in the degree program.
  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) [M.A. & Ph.D. only] The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Aptitude Test is required of all students who are native English speakers and who are applying from within the U.S. and Canada.
  • Reinstatement/Readmission Policy
    If fewer than five years have elapsed since withdrawal and the student was in good standing at the time of withdrawal, a student may petition the Dean for reinstatement. If there are any questions concerning the student’s status, the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum will be consulted and the student will be asked to submit a letter that should be clear in discussing previous academic work, future plans, and the basis for successfully completing the program. The Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum may or may not grant credit for the previous work, depending on grades.

IV. Definitions of Students Status

While full-time status is strongly recommended for each student, circumstances may make less than full-time study necessary. The following definitions are given for academic purposes. NOTE: These definitions are not necessarily the same as those used by the Office of Financial Assistance.

M.A./M.Litt./M.M.H. Candidates

M.A. candidates registered for courses:

  • Full-time students carry three courses per semester. In certain instances a student may, with the approval of his/her adviser and the Dean, register for four courses for credit in a given semester.
  • Half-time students carry two courses per semester.
  • Part-time students carry one course per semester.

M.A. candidates not registered for courses:

  • Students are classified as full-time for one additional year for thesis preparation.
  • Students who have finished the above additional semesters are classified as part-time (less than half-time).
  • Students may be classified as full-time for an additional semester upon presentation of a satisfactory plan of study to the Dean.

Ph.D./D.Litt./D.M.H. Candidates

Students registered for courses:

  • Full-time students carry three courses per semester. In rare instances a student may, with the approval of his/her adviser and the Dean, register for four courses for credit in a given semester.
  • Half-time students carry two courses per semester.
  • Part-time students carry one course per semester.
  • Ph.D. candidates registered for dissertation year are full-time students in each of the two semesters (one semester for D.Litt./D.M.H.) they are so registered, carrying nine credits per semester.

Doctoral candidates not registered for course work or dissertation year:

  • Students who have been full-time while taking course may be considered full-time students for no more than two semesters while they maintain continuous registration for language examination preparation. Students who have been less than full-time during course work will retain the same status as they maintain matriculation, unless a change of status is approved by the Dean. Such approval may depend on submission of evidence that the circumstances that necessitated less than full-time study have changed, enabling the student to devote him/herself to a full-time schedule of study. The visa status of international students may be affected by such classification, as may the deferment of required repayment on federal student loans. For part-time students, completion of course work will be considered equivalent to two years of full-time status (which will allow them five additional years to complete the program).
  • Students who have been full-time while taking course work may be considered to be full-time students for a maximum of two semesters while they maintain matriculation in preparation for capstone essays. A student failing the capstone essays, in whole or in part, may be considered a full-time student for two additional semesters upon approval of the Dean. Students who have been less than full-time during course work will retain the same status as they maintain matriculation, unless a change of status is approved by the Dean. Such approval could follow on submission of evidence that the circumstances that necessitated less than full-time study have changed, enabling the student to devote him/herself to a full-time schedule of study. A student who has completed capstone essays may register for up to two semesters of dissertation prospectus preparation with the approval of a Dean.
  • Ph.D. candidates who have completed the dissertation year may be considered full-time students for two additional semesters upon presentation of a satisfactory plan of study to the Dean. Such a plan should contain a schedule of work on the dissertation warranting full-time status and should be approved by the first reader on the student’s committee. Students who have not maintained matriculation for more than two semesters under the conditions listed in IV.B.3.b. above may apply for a second year of full-time status upon submission of a satisfactory plan of study for that year. Such a plan must include a narrative of the progress made during the first year and must be certified by the first reader. A student who has not been in full-time status following the dissertation year may subsequently be granted full-time status upon presentation of a satisfactory plan of study approved by the first reader. Such students must also demonstrate to the Dean that the circumstances requiring less than full-time study have changed so as to make full-time status possible. All other students who have completed the dissertation year will be classified as part-time.
  • Students wishing to maintain continuous registration for reasons other than those dealt with above may do so only upon consultation with and approval of the Dean.
  • All students either must be enrolled in courses of study or must pay continuous registration  fees in order to be considered students who are proceeding toward a degree in the Caspersen School. Those students who successfully complete their final oral examination of the dissertation and submit all required paperwork before commencement or before the first day of the Spring Semester will not be required to maintain matriculation for the following semester in order to graduate.

Withdrawal from the Caspersen School.

A student who wishes to withdraw from the Caspersen School must submit an online withdrawal form at the Registrar’s Office website. Refunds are made only upon formal withdrawal and as indicated in the University Catalog. A student who has withdrawn may be readmitted under III.F above. The reentry process is initiated in the Caspersen School Office by the student obtaining a reentry form from the Dean’s Office website under the Forms link.

A graduate student who wishes to enroll in another degree program at Drew shall formally withdraw from the Caspersen School program in which he/she is enrolled. The student may apply for readmission under XII.H. below, except that the continuous registration fees will be waived.

V. The Schedule of the Caspersen School PH.D. Capstone essays:

  • The schedule of capstone essays will individually arranged among the Area, the advisors and the Dean’s Office. Students’ capstone essay petitions must be approved by the Academic Standing Committee before students may begin the essays.
  • The essays should be graded within two weeks after they are delivered to the grader.
  • Notification of grades will be made by the Caspersen School once ALL essay results are in. A report will be sent to the student and also to the Registrar’s Office so that grades may entered into the student’s transcript file.

 

Dissertation supervision and oral examinations

  • Professors will not be expected, under ordinary circumstances, to supervise M.A./M.Litt./M.M.H. theses or Ph.D./D.Litt./D.M.H. dissertations from the end of May until the first of September or to read capstone essays during that period. When a student faces exceptional hardship, however, such as the probable loss of a job or a required return to his/her homeland, professors may be asked to assist in the completion and examination of theses and dissertations during the summer.

Committees

  • The administrative committees of the Caspersen School will confine their meetings to the period beginning September first and ending at Commencement in May. The only exceptions will be the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum, which will meet as soon as possible after the grades have been turned in (usually June) to review the second semester records of all students.

VI. Graduate Faculty Membership

Membership in the Graduate Faculty shall include:

  • Those who have been directly appointed to membership, in which case appointments shall be subject to the procedures prescribed in the Bylaws of the University and in the University Personnel Policy.
  • Those elected to membership by the Graduate Faculty on recommendation of the Dean’s Council. In instances of initial appointment to the faculties of the University, members may be elected by the Dean’s Council acting as the agent of the Faculty. Eligibility for election shall be limited to those members of the other faculties holding the doctorate (or its equivalent in professional preparation or attainment) and who are involved in some aspect of current Graduate instruction or who are to be involved in new Graduate programs approved by the Caspersen School. Normally, membership in the Graduate Faculty should be accorded to those offering graduate-level courses and who are at the rank of Assistant professor or above. In special circumstances, however, the Faculty may elect to membership individuals who do not fulfill all the normal criteria.
  • Ex-officio Members, as provided by the Bylaws of the University, i.e., the President, the Provost, the Academic Deans, the Registrar, and the Director of the University Library.
  • From time to time, the Dean’s Council shall review the list of members of the Graduate Faculty, removing the names of persons who no longer meet the qualifications for membership.

VII. Graduate Faculty Meetings

Frequency
A minimum of three faculty meetings will be held per year (Fall, Winter, Spring). Special meetings may be called by the Dean or by the written request of twenty percent of the Graduate Faculty.

Quorum
A quorum shall be declared when one-third of the faculty is present.

Conduct of business
The routine business of the Graduate Faculty shall be carried out through the Dean of the Caspersen School and the Standing Committees, operating under the mandate of Graduate Faculty policy statements. The committees shall submit regular reports to the Graduate Faculty and shall request Faculty rulings when the matter before them is not covered by stated policy.

VIII. Standing Committees of the Graduate Faculty

Election
Faculty members on standing committees shall be nominated by the Dean, in consultation with the Dean’s Council, and elected by the Faculty.

The standing committees:

Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum
The Committee shall maintain an overview of the curriculum, approve new courses, receive notice of tutorials approved by the Areas, review and approve subjects for capstone essays, receive reports on examinations from Areas with power to approve or disapprove, receive and ratify the recommendations of Areas pertaining to advanced standing, review those prospectuses of Ph.D. dissertations which have been acted upon by an Area, deal with petitions for extensions of time beyond seven (7) years for the doctoral and five (5) for the master’s degrees, review all requests for grade changes, approve all language examination substitutions and review assessment policies, plans and analyses. All Areas shall be represented in committee membership, if practicable, which shall also include a chair, one student, the Dean, Associate Dean and Registrar, all of whom vote.

Dean’s Council
The Committee shall propose to the Faculty general educational policy (both by direction of the Faculty and on its own initiative) and will develop long-range planning for the Caspersen School. It will also consider policy questions referred to it by other committees. In the interim between stated meetings of the Faculty, the committee may act for the Faculty in matters of administration and policy, reporting its actions to the Faculty, and reserving to the Faculty any decision that it considers to be of major importance. The committee may advise the Dean concerning all appointments to the faculty. It shall have the prerogative of nominating for election to the Faculty persons belonging to other faculties of the University, and it has the power to elect to the Caspersen School Faculty any new appointees to the University whose qualifications meet the needs of the Caspersen School. Membership shall include the Deans and all Area conveners; Caspersen School Administrators, the Director of the Library, the Director of Graduate Admissions, the Director of Financial Assistance, and the Registrar, ex-officio, with voice but without vote; and one student, chosen by the Graduate Students Association, who has every privilege of the committee except voting on faculty nominations and elections.

Committee on Faculty
The Committee on Faculty will deal with all issues pertaining to promotion, tenure and faculty accountability. It shall consist of faculty elected to the committee who are tenured. Only one of the members can be an Associate Professor. The Chair of the COF is selected by the Dean. The Dean and Associate Dean of the Caspersen School will be members with voice but not vote. The Committee on Faculty shall send recommendations to the Dean of the Caspersen School pertaining to all matters affecting promotion and tenure of members of the Graduate Faculty. The Dean makes the School’s final recommendation on all such matters to the Board of Trustees.

IX. Student Participation in Governance of the Caspersen School

The matter of student representation on Caspersen School committees and subcommittees beyond the Dean’s Council and the Committee on Academic Standing is left open for consideration with the understanding that definite proposals for the inclusion of students on specific committees may be submitted as desirable.

  • Students and faculty of each Area are encouraged to meet together periodically to discuss curriculum and other matters of concern. Students are also encouraged to initiate such conversations.

Student representation at faculty meetings:

  • Three student representatives—one the Convener of the GSA, the other two elected annually for one-year terms by the GSA—may participate in the meetings of the Graduate Faculty, with voice but not vote.
  • Executive Session: When the Faculty deems it desirable in order to consider items of a confidential nature, it may, by a simple majority vote, resolve itself into executive session excluding the student representatives.
  • Student representatives serving on the Dean’s Council are expected to report matters of GSA concern regularly to the Dean’s Council.

X. Time Limits for Earning Each Degree

All requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Letters, and Doctor of Medical Humanities degrees must be completed within a period of seven (7) years.

All requirements for the Master of Arts, Master of Letters and Master of Medical Humanities degrees must be completed within a period of five (5) years.

Upon written approval of the Dean, a student may take a leave of absence for a term not to exceed one year. In special cases, a second one-year leave may be approved by the Dean. Students requesting a leave of absence must contact the Dean or Associate Dean before such a request will be approved and must obtain the approval of the Associate Dean. The Dean of the Caspersen School is empowered to grant leaves of absence on only three bases: (1) physical illness, (2) mental or emotional illness, and (3) extreme financial difficulty. As the student pays no tuition or fees during a leave of absence, he/she is not entitled to use any of the resources of the University: library, faculty, housing, or grants-in-aid. Time spent in leaves of absence will not be counted as part of the five-year time limitation for Master’s degrees or  the seven-year time limitation for doctoral degrees. Repayment for any student loans must begin in a leave of absence, by federal regulation.

XI. Essential Elements of Graduate Study

Caspersen School Standards of Academic Honesty

Standards of honesty in the academic world derive from the nature of the academic enterprise itself. Scholars use writing both to create knowledge and to record knowledge, and students are invited into the academic enterprise through an intellectual conversation that occurs primarily in writing. Through the exchange of written texts, students contribute to the academic conversation and develop their intellectual skills. Since academic dishonesty necessarily hinders such development, it cannot be tolerated under any circumstances. Accordingly, Drew University has established standards of academic integrity and procedures governing violations of them. These basic standards apply to all work done at Drew. Students are expected to study and comply with these principles as stated below.

Categories of Academic Dishonesty

The categories of academic integrity apply to information that is presented orally, in writing, the computer, in format ranging from the most informal comment to a formal research paper or a dissertation. These standards apply to source material gathered from other people, from written texts, from computer programs, from the internet, or from any other location. These include but are not limited to plagiarism, duplicate submission, cheating on examinations, and false citation. All members of the academic community are obliged, by that membership, to report instances of presumed dishonesty to the appropriate officials.

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is the act of appropriating or imitating the language, ideas, or thoughts of another and presenting them as one’s own or without proper acknowledgment. This includes submitting as one’s own a thesis, a paper, or part of a paper written by another person, whether that material was stolen, purchased, or shared freely. It also includes submitting a paper containing insufficient citation or misuse of source material.

Duplicate Submission:
Submitting one work in identical or similar form to fulfill more than one requirement without prior approval of the relevant faculty members is a breach of academic integrity. This includes using a paper for more than one course or submitting material previously used to meet another requirement.

Cheating on Examinations:
Cheating on examinations by copying material from another person or source or by gaining any advance knowledge of the content or topic of an examination without the permission of the instructor is another breach of academic integrity. In the case of take-home examinations, the guidelines under collaboration (below) apply; failure to follow those guidelines constitutes academic dishonesty.

False Citation:
Listing an author, title, or page reference as the source for obtained material, when the material actually came from another source or from another location within that source, is a breach of academic integrity. This includes attributing fabricated material to a real or fictitious source.

Basic Requirements for the Acknowledging Sources

Quotation:
All quotations, however short, must be identified as such. In written texts they must be placed in quotation marks or be clearly indented, and the complete source must be cited either in the text or in a footnote or endnote.

Paraphrase:
Any borrowed material that is summarized, restated, or reworked must be cited as such, whether it is used in written or oral form. The paraphrased material must be clearly indicated by a signal phrase (including the author’s name) at the beginning and a page citation or footnote/endnote marker at the end. Students should take careful notes when reading and researching so that they properly acknowledge sources and produce them upon request. Lapse of time or substantial reworking of researched material does not eliminate the obligation to give due recognition.

Collaboration:
If a student has collaborated with another person or group of people and used research data gathered by others or significant ideas developed in collaboration (via notes, conferences, conversations, e-mail communications, etc.) as part of a paper or assignment, the extent and nature of the contribution must be clearly indicated. Students collaborating on an assignment must give proper acknowledgment both to the extent of the collaboration and to any team member whose specific ideas or words played a significant role in the development of the thesis, the argument, or the structure of the finished work. Unless a paper or assignment is collaboratively authored (and acknowledged as such), the presentation of the ideas, the interpretation of the data, and the organization of sentences and paragraphs should be original and should differ significantly from those in the papers or assignments of others who have collaborated on the research.

Material in the Public Domain:
While facts and concepts borrowed from a source should be properly acknowledged, certain well-known facts, proverbs, and famous quotations are regarded as in the public domain and their source need not be cited. That the First World War started in 1914 does not require citation, nor does “To be or not to be” call for citation of its exact whereabouts in Hamlet. What constitutes “public domain” varies according to discipline; if in doubt, students should consult the instructor.

Bibliography/Works Cited:
All sources consulted in preparing a paper or assignment are to be listed in the bibliography or works cited list, unless other instructions are given. While in some disciplines works listed in the bibliography may not necessarily be directly referred to in the paper or notes, all sources included in the works cited list must appear in the paper. Simply listing a work in the bibliography or works cited list does not remove the obligation to give due recognition for specific use in the body of the paper.

Forms of Reference:
If individual departments or instructors require that a particular style be used for quotations, footnotes, endnotes, bibliographies, etc., students should be made aware of that requirement. For most theses and dissertations, students will be asked to follow the guidelines to be found in The Chicago Manual of Style, (CMS), 16th ed. (University of Chicago Press, 2010) or the version of CMS in A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, (Turabian), 8th ed. by Kate Turabian (University of Chicago Press, 2013). Otherwise, for standard forms students may consult The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, (MLA), 7th ed. (New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2009) in the humanities, or the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th ed. (New York: American Psychological Association, 2010) in the social sciences.

Examples of Plagiarism

The following examples, from Rebecca Moore Howard’s “A Plagiarism Pentimento” (Journal of Teaching Writing, Summer 1993), are provided to help prevent any misunderstanding. Please read and analyze them carefully.
Source:
Davidson, Robert. Genesis 1-11. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1973.
Original Wording:
“Such ‘story myths’ are not told for their entertainment value. They provide answers to questions people ask about life, about society and about the world in which they live” (10).
Misuse of Source (1):
Specifically, story myths serve as answers to questions people ask about life, about society, and about the world in which they live, not for entertainment purposes.
Comment:
This is an example of plagiarism as defined here. The student copied words and phrases from the original without acknowledging their source. Although the student has rearranged some phrases and made minor stylistic changes, this version still follows the basic wording and structure of the original while the student repeats ideas as if they were his or her own.
Misuse of Source (2):
Davidson explains that story myths answer questions people ask about life, about society and about the world that we live in (10).
Comment:
Less obviously, this example is also classified as plagiarism. Although the student cites the source of the ideas, he or she presents Davidson’s exact words as if he or she authored them. As is often the case in such plagiarism, where the words are changed, the changes render the material less clear (shifting from “people” to “we” for example).

How to Avoid Unintentional Plagiarism

Unintentional plagiarism is also a breach of academic integrity and may be punished accordingly. Unintentional plagiarism, also known as patchwriting, occurs when students depend too heavily on textual material to make a point rather than making the point themselves and using the text to support it. The second example of plagiarism above is an example of patchwriting; it may be rewritten in several different ways:
Misuse of Source (2):
Davidson explains that story myths answer questions people ask about life, about society and about the world that we live in (10).

Rewritten with Correct Citation:
Davidson explains that “story myths” answer “questions people ask about life, about society and about the world in which they live” (10).

Paraphrased
As Davidson explains, the importance of “story myths” is in their relevance to the everyday lives of their readers (10).

Use of Paraphrase and Quotation in a Paragraph:
“Story myths” are powerful because they deal with phenomena that people cannot understand in any other way. As Davidson explains, story myths have direct relevance to the everyday lives of their readers by “provid[ing] answers to questions” (10).

Comment:
In the rewritten version of the plagiarized sentence (a), the student has quoted all of the words that came directly from Davidson. Although this is an acceptable sentence, obviously such extensive quotation would not be acceptable throughout a research paper. In the sample paraphrase (b), the writer has maintained and correctly cited the essential idea in Davidson’s sentence, but the articulation of that idea is original, very different from the source. This is an example of an appropriate use of source material. In the final example (c), the writer has used Davidson’s analysis to support a point he or she is making about the role of “story myths,” and combined paraphrase and quotation to show how Davidson supports the assertion. This is the most common way to use source material in academic papers.
Notice that in all three examples the writer introduces the source material with a signal phrase naming the author and marks the end of the use of that source material with a parenthetical page reference. Although the exact method of citation varies across the disciplines, the purpose—to mark the beginning and end of material drawn from another source—remains the same.

Procedures for cases of academic dishonesty

The University holds academic honesty and scholarly integrity to be indispensable to genuine learning and true scholarship. Breaches of academic honesty and integrity are inimical to the learner or scholar personally and are infringements of the mutual faith and trust essential to the academic enterprise.

Examples of such breaches are: cheating on examinations or papers; misrepresenting the nature and extent of one’s research; offering work done by others as one’s own; plagiarism–employing words and/or ideas originating with others without proper acknowledgment; improperly providing information, papers or projects to others; falsifying the nature or results of one’s research.

It is the explicit policy of the Caspersen School never to accept the same paper for more than one course without the clear, written, and prior consent of all instructors involved.

Responsibility
All members of the academic community, faculty and students, are obliged, by that membership, to report observed instances of presumed academic dishonesty to the Dean.

Sanctions
Sanctions are provided for demonstrated breaches of academic honesty or scholarly integrity. Where dishonesty has been determined, sanctions may range from requiring an assignment to be redone, to automatic failure for a course, to dismissal from the University.

Procedures for dealing with alleged academic dishonesty
These regulations of the Caspersen School provide procedures whereby instances of alleged academic dishonesty are dealt with in an orderly way with due attention to the rights of the student(s) involved.

When an accusation of academic dishonesty is brought, the Dean of the Caspersen School will convene and chair an Academic Integrity Committee made up of two faculty members, one member of the Graduate Faculty assigned to such duty, one student appointed by the GSA, the Caspersen School Deans, and the accused student’s academic advisor or another faculty member of the accused student’s choosing.

If any of the above are party to the case (i.e., complainant or defendant), the Dean shall arrange an appropriate replacement. When any member of the Committee believes that he or she should not hear a case because of possible conflict of interest, that member should excuse him or herself. The accused student may request that a specific faculty member or student not be asked to hear the case; this request will be honored. In either case, the Committee will be reconvened using other members from the appropriate pool.

In all proceedings, the accused shall be permitted to make a written and/or oral statement and may be represented by a faculty member who shall not be a member of the review committee. The accused student may request, and will be granted, at least a week to prepare his or her response before being called before the Committee. In the first stage of the hearing, both the faculty member bringing the charge and the accused student will be present, and each will make an oral statement to the Committee and answer any questions. At this stage, either may ask to address the Committee without the other’s being present and will be granted the right to do so.

The accused student and the accusing faculty member will be asked to wait outside the room while the Committee discusses the case, and either may be called back into the room to answer questions. At the end of their deliberations on the case, the Dean of the Caspersen School, the faculty members and the student will vote on the matter, while the advisor will have a voice but no vote.

A decision of guilt or innocence will be based on a preponderance of the evidence in the case; however, other factors, such as any prior accusations or any mitigating circumstances, may be taken into account in the determination of penalty.

In all cases, both the accused student and the faculty member bringing the charge may appeal the decision as described below.

In instances of admitted plagiarism, the Dean is authorized to dispose of the case, without a hearing, by imposing the maximum penalty, if the student prefers to have the case resolved by such means and such terms.

Penalties
The individual merits of each case are weighed by the Committee, which determines the penalty accordingly. The Committee considers the purpose of both the hearing and the penalty to be educational; penalties are determined with that in mind.

a. First offense
(1) Course Work: maximum penalty: loss of credit for the course.
(2) Language examinations: maximum penalty: failure of the examination.
(3) Capstone essay: maximum penalty: failure of all capstone essays.
(4) Thesis or dissertation: maximum penalty: rejection of thesis or dissertation and this option: either dismissal or permission to submit a new topic.
(5) Lesser penalties require the concurrence of the instructor (in the case of a course) or the Area (in the case of capstone essays).
(6) Greater penalties require the concurrence of the Graduate Faculty.

b. Second offense: Maximum penalty: dismissal from the Caspersen School.

c. For course work, exams, essays, theses, and dissertations already accepted in partial fulfillment of degrees already conferred:
First Offense: The maximum penalty is suspension from Drew and/or the revocation of a graduate degree issued by Drew. Other penalties may include, but are not limited to, denial of some or all honors conferred by the university and loss of credit for the assignment or for the course. A letter stating the Committee’s ruling will be placed in the student’s file in the Dean of the Caspersen School’s office, where it will remain. Any such letters will be a part of the record in subsequent cases and appeals.

Appeal Process

Decisions of the Academic Integrity Committee may be appealed only if new evidence has been found or if the original hearing overlooked specific evidence or committed procedural errors.

The Dean’s Council is the final appeals board for cases of academic dishonesty. The appeal, whether sought by the faculty member who brought the charge or by the accused student, must be submitted in writing. On the basis of the written appeal, the Dean’s Council may decide to hear the case or to uphold the original decision if no new evidence has been presented, if no evidence has been shown to have been overlooked, and/or if no procedural errors have been shown to have occurred. Whatever its decision, the Dean’s Council must provide reasons in writing to both parties. If the Dean’s Council agrees to hear the case, it has the right to reverse the decision of an earlier hearing.

While the Dean of the Caspersen School will remain in attendance during such hearings, he or she will have a voice but no vote.

When any member of the Dean’s Council believes he or she should not hear the matter under appeal because of a possible conflict of interest, that member may be excused.

During the hearing of the appeal, the faculty member who brought the original charge will provide information and answer questions. The student may be accompanied and advised by a member of the faculty of his or her choice and will also provide information and answer questions.

Decisions will be based on a preponderance of the evidence and will be provided in writing to both parties.

XII. Registration

Procedure

Prior to the beginning of a new semester, material concerning registration will be sent to all students. Registration is required of all candidates each semester on dates announced in the University calendar. Registration should take place normally through the online system (Treehouse). If students fail to register by the end of the add/drop period without an Leave of Absence or Withdrawal status, will have their student status revised to Inactive Status. A student not registered for two (2) consecutive Semesters (which excludes Summer and January term sessions) by the end of the Add/Drop period of the second consecutive Semester and does not have either a Leave of Absence or Withdrawal Status recorded for them, will have their Student Status revised to Withdrawal. 

Tutorials
 

  • Normally, only one tutorial per semester shall count as one of the three full-time courses. Normally, only two tutorials are allowed in the Ph.D., D.Litt. and D.M.H. programs.

Procedure for securing approval for a tutorial shall be as follows:

  • The student shall file a standard petition in the Caspersen School Office, bearing the signatures of (1) the proposed instructor and (2) the student’s faculty adviser.
  • The Caspersen School Office shall then forward the petition to the appropriate Area convener for action by the Area.
  • The Area shall return the petition with a report of its action to the Caspersen School Office for forwarding to the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum. The ASC reserves the right to deny tutorial petitions. The review and response process takes a minimum of two weeks.
  • Whenever two Areas are involved in a proposed tutorial, both must take affirmative action in order to validate the petition.
  • Failure by the student to comply with this procedure at any point will mean loss of credit for the tutorial.
  • Normally, tutorials are not permitted during the summer.
  • It is expected that all tutorials meet the academic requirements of courses in the CSGS programs. All tutorials must include a final graded product, which arises from the work done in the tutorial.
  • D.M.H. students may only register for a total of two tutorials (either MEDHM 901 Tutorial or MEDHM 903 Clinical Tutorial).
  • Tutorial petitions for the spring semester are due in the Caspersen School Office by December 1. Petitions for fall semester tutorials are due in the Office by May 1.
  • Tutorials may be counted as seminars.

Auditing

  • A student may informally audit without charge any course given at the University, including seminars, relevant to his/her program with the approval of the instructor.
  • A spouse of a currently enrolled student may informally audit without charge two Caspersen School courses per semester with the approval of the instructor.
  • In no case shall an auditor be counted as a member of a seminar or be allowed to displace a tuition-paying student.
  • Informal auditors are more in the category of observers than of active participants. If they disrupt the class in the judgment of the professor, they may be asked to leave or discontinue attendance.
  • If the student (or spouse) wishes to have the course recorded on his/her permanent record, the student must: register for the course as an audit; have the instructor certify to the Registrar that the requirements for an audit have been satisfied; pay the audit tuition (see the Business Office website for the charge).

Residence credit at other institutions

  • Credit up to three courses for the Ph.D. and two courses for the M.A. may be given for courses taken at other graduate schools while the student is enrolled at Drew, if such courses are deemed essential to his/her program of study by the Area and are approved by the Dean.  The student must petition the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum to take such courses prior to enrollment. Such courses will be regarded as under the direction of the Caspersen School and as work done in residence.
  • This rule also applies to tutorials to be given by off-campus instructors.

Undergraduate enrollment in graduate courses

  • On recommendation by the Dean of the College and on the approval of the instructor of the course, undergraduate students may enroll in graduate courses and seminars, provided that : (1) the student’s grade point average in his/her concentration is at least 3.00, (2) the total number of undergraduates shall not exceed one-third of the class, (3) he/she can fulfill the prerequisite qualification as set by the instructor and the Area. Exceptions to these rules must be made by a petition from the Area to the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum.

Advanced Standing

  • Ordinarily, the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum does not honor a student’s request for advanced standing until the student has completed one year of full-time study (or equivalent) and passed a language examination. Students are advised not to present requests for advanced standing until they have met those conditions. Advanced standing is not normally granted in the M.Litt., D.Litt., or the M.M.H. and D.M.H. programs.
  • For the M.A.: Up to two courses of Master’s degree work done at another institution may be counted toward the course work requirement for the M.A. at Drew on recommendation of the Area concerned and approval by the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum.

For the Ph.D.:

  • Up to three courses (9 course credits) may be given for previous work of graduate level in a student’s field on recommendation by the Area concerned and approval by the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum.
  • Normally, work undertaken for professional degrees such as the M.Div. degree (or its equivalent) will not be given credit toward advanced standing.
  • Any Area may recommend credit toward advanced standing for graduate courses (regardless of the degree earned) on a course-by-course basis.
  • Students desiring credit for advanced standing must initiate the process by submitting to the Dean a written request supported by transcripts and other academic credentials.

Transferring from one degree program to another

  • Transfer from one course of study (Area, degree, or program) to another requires the approval of the receiving Area.
  • Ph.D. students who wish to translate to the D.Litt. or D.M.H. must: a) complete the Arts and Letters or D.M.H. application, including a rationale for translating (as part of the required personal statement). The application fee is waived; b) arrange for an interview with the Director of the Arts and Letters or Medical Humanities Program as appropriate; and c) abide by the decision of the Arts and Letters/Medical Humanities Admissions Committee. Students should be aware that scholarship assistance differs between the Ph.D. and the D.Litt.

XIII. Academic Standards

The grading system

The system of grading in the Caspersen School, including letter grades as well as + or -, shall be as follows:
A (Honors) highest possible achievement
A excellence
B average
C below average
F fail
I Incompletes are sometimes necessary, but should be avoided since faculty are often unavailable to accept late work after a semester is completed. Students must fill out an incomplete form and obtain the signature of the instructor and the Dean and return the form to the Dean’s office.

Numerical equivalents are:
A(Honors) = 4.33; A = 4.0; A- = 3.77;
B+ = 3.33; B = 3.0; B- = 2.67
C+ = 2.33; C = 2.0; C- = 1.67
F = 0

Courses dropped between the end of the second and the end of the ninth week of classes are graded W (Withdrew); courses dropped after the ninth week of classes are graded F.

Grade requirements

  • M.A., M.A.T., M.Litt., C.M.H., and M.M.H. candidates must have an average of at least 3.0 to graduate. M.F.A. students must receive an S grade in all classes to graduate.
  • Ph.D. candidates must have an average of at least 3.1 and must manifest excellence at certain points in course work in order to (a) sit for the capstone essays and (b) to undertake the dissertation. D.Litt. and D.M.H. candidates must have an average of at least 3.1 and must manifest excellence at certain points in course work in order to undertake the dissertation.
  • The History and Culture Area will review a student’s academic performance before approving the petition for the capstone essays.
  • The maintenance of a 3.1 average, therefore, does not necessarily qualify the candidate to complete the doctoral degree inasmuch as the doctorate represents something more than an overall minimal performance.
  • Students who have not met the required average at the conclusion of the stipulated number of courses required for a given degree may not seek to meet the required average by taking additional courses without specific permission from the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum, in consultation with the Area.
  • In judging a student’s standing, courses failed will count as courses taken.
  • Unresolved or permanent incompletes will be considered courses taken that did not meet Drew’s required standards.
  • Students may retake a course, when offered, in which the grade of F was originally earned with the permission of the instructor and the Dean. The original and subsequent grades are both calculated in the grade point average. Courses with grades of C- or higher may not be retaken for credit.

Review of Candidacy

  • The candidacy of any given student whose record falls below the required averages or who fails to meet other standards of progress set by the Caspersen School (e.g., the language requirement) will be reviewed by the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum.
  • The Committee will review such records as soon as possible following the conclusion of each semester and, where necessary, at the beginning of the fall semester. Review may also occur at other times.
  • The Committee is empowered to take the following actions relative to the students who fail to meet the stipulated averages or other standards of progress: issue letters of academic warning (probation) and, in consultation with the student’s Area, recommend or require leaves of absence or withdrawal; enforce, or, where deemed warranted, grant limited exceptions to the schedule for meeting the foreign language requirement. In the Caspersen School, a letter of academic warning or probation notice serves as a warning to the student that unless the deficiencies noted in the letter are corrected, involuntary withdrawal from the program may result. It expires immediately upon the successful correction of the student’s academic deficiency (low GPA, excessive incompletes, etc.)
  • The student, the Dean, the student’s academic adviser, and the Area convener will be notified of all actions taken with respect to a student’s academic status.

Students failing to maintain the required average normally will be dealt with as follows:

1.M.A., M.Litt., and M.M.H. Candidates

  • At the conclusion of the first semester in which a student’s average falls below 3.0, a letter of warning will be issued; should the record appear seriously deficient, more stringent action may be taken. Should this occur in the semester in which the student would normally complete the course work for the degree, the Committee must grant permission before additional course work can be undertaken.
  • A student who does not have the required average at the conclusion of this second semester (that is, the end of the semester following the semester in which the student’s average falls below the required grade point average) may be advised or required to terminate his/her program, or may be granted permission to enroll in additional courses in order to attempt to rectify the average.
  • Normally, students allowed to undertake additional courses in order to rectify the grade average will be expected to achieve good standing in no more than an additional full semester, failing which, they will be involuntarily withdrawn from the program.

2.Ph.D., D.Litt., and D.M.H. Candidates

  • At the conclusion of the first semester in which a student’s average falls below a 3.1, a letter of warning will be issued; should the record be deemed seriously deficient, more stringent action may be taken. Should this occur in the semester in which the student would normally complete the course work stipulated for the degree, permission from the Committee must be secured before additional course work is undertaken.
  • A student who fails to secure the required minimum average or to demonstrate promise of excellence in some area of study by the end of the semester following the first warning letter may be advised or required to terminate his/her program.
  • A student whose average is deficient for a third semester normally will be required to terminate his/her program.
  • Normally, students allowed to undertake additional courses in order to rectify the grade average will be expected to achieve good standing in no more than an additional full semester, failing which, they will be involuntarily withdrawn from the program.

Completion of Work

Students are expected to complete and submit all assigned work for a course no later than the end of the semester in which the course is taken.

  • In special circumstances, a student may request from the faculty member an extension of time for the completion of the work. If the faculty member concurs and sets a date for completion within the next five months, the student shall fill out the Incomplete Request Form, countersigned by the faculty member and the Dean, to notify the Dean and the Chair of the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum of the arrangement.
  • Requests for extensions must be initiated and settled before the end of the grading period (three weeks after the end of the term). Where this is done and the work has not been submitted by the final date for reporting grades for the semester, the instructor shall report a temporary grade of INC (Incomplete) for that student. Exceptions must be approved by the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum.
  • Work left incomplete from the Fall Semester must be completed by April 15th. Work left incomplete from the Spring Semester must be completed by October 1st. Where work for a course has not been completed by those final dates, the instructor shall submit a grade based on whatever work is in hand, with due deduction made for the work outstanding. In extraordinary circumstances, he/she may record a permanent INC (Incomplete). After November 1st and June 1st respectively, any grades registered as incomplete from the previous semester will be converted automatically to F. Change of the grade will require the permission of the Committee on Academic Standing.
  • Students should not request an Incomplete without having explored reasonable possibilities for completing the assigned work on schedule. However, situations leading to the granting of an Incomplete are sometimes unavoidable.

Submission of Grades

  • Grades for Caspersen School courses and for graduate students enrolled in courses for graduate credit shall be submitted by the Faculty no later than three weeks after the semester ends or by the deadline set by the University Registrar.
  • Where a student’s work is not completed by the final date for reporting grades and no process for an incomplete has been initiated, a final grade shall be reported based upon the work submitted, with appropriate deductions for missing work.

XIV. Appeal of a Grade

Responsibility for Grades
The assignment of final grades for a course shall be the responsibility of the instructor in charge of the course.

Appeal of grades
A student who believes a final course grade to be in error, unfair, or inappropriate should take the following steps:

  • The student shall first seek to resolve the matter in conversation with the instructor of the course.
  • If, after conferring with the instructor of the course, the issue is still not resolved, the student should confer with the Area Convener, or with the Dean, if the course falls outside the Area or if the instructor of the course is also the Convener of the Area. If the course is within the Area and the instructor is not the Convener, the Convener may confer with the instructor or convene a meeting of the Area Faculty to consider the matter. If the instructor is also the Convener of the Area, the Dean shall confer with the instructor/convener. If deemed desirable, the Dean may convene a meeting of the Area Faculty to consider the matter, either chairing the meeting or asking a member of the Area other than the convener to chair the meeting.
  • If the matter is not resolved through the Area, or the course falls outside the student’s Area, the student may appeal to the Dean with a request that the complaint be heard by the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum. The Dean can then propose that the matter be resolved by having the contested grade evaluated by an anonymous outside reader. If both parties, student and instructor, agree to this process in writing, the Dean will recruit a faculty member with competence in the subject matter of the course to read and evaluate all the assigned work of the student. The outside reader, not knowing who the student is, and not knowing the original grade, will submit a grade to the Dean. This grade, if higher than the original grade, will be considered the final grade for the course. If the submitted grade is lower than the original grade, then the original grade will stand. There is no appeal of the grade submitted by the outside reviewer.  If the Dean deems that the matter cannot be otherwise resolved, he/she will forward the appeal to the Committee.
  • No complaining instructor or student who is party to the appeal shall sit as a member of the Committee while it is hearing the appeal.
  • A student appealing to the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum shall submit a written statement setting forth the reasons he/she believes the grade to be in error, unfair, or inappropriate. This statement shall be forwarded to the instructor, who shall submit a statement explaining the reasons the grade was given and why a change is not appropriate. The instructor’s statement shall be furnished to the student prior to the hearing. The Committee may require of both the instructor and the student copies of all documents it judges to be relevant to its deliberations.
  • The Committee shall invite both the student and the instructor to attend the hearing. The student and the instructor may be counseled, advised, and represented before the Committee by any Drew faculty member, administrator, or student who is not a member of the Committee and who agrees to serve. Using such representation is optional.
  • With the approval of the Committee, either party may invite Drew Faculty members, administrators, and/or students other than the principals to make either written or personal statements to the Committee, provided their relevance to the issue can be demonstrated in advance.
  • In its conduct of the hearing and in its deliberations, the Committee shall seek to determine to what extent the issue is one of procedure in the treatment of a particular student and to what extent the issue is one of substance, i.e., the evaluation of the quality of the student’s work.

After the hearing, the Committee, in executive session, shall determine its conclusions.

a. If the issue is determined to be basically procedural, the Committee will decide whether the grade has been fairly assigned. If it decides that a change should be made, it may request the Registrar to do so. The Committee’s decision shall be put in writing and copies forwarded to the Dean, the Area Convener, the student, and the professor. Should either party object to the Committee’s decision, either party may appeal to the Dean’s Council. The Dean’s Council is the final court of appeal. The Dean’s Council, meeting in Executive session, will examine written materials submitted to the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum and come to a final decision.

b. If the issue is determined to be basically substantive, the Committee may recommend that the instructor reconsider the grade in light of considerations that the Committee sets forth or it may recommend that the Dean appoint a panel of faculty to review the student’s work and recommend a grade. In the latter instance, work of other students enrolled in the course should be included in the review, if at all possible, in order to relate the work of the student under review to the instructor’s evaluation of the work of other students in the course. Such a review panel shall communicate its decision to the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum, which will make a decision and recommend a grade to the Registrar. This decision will be reported in writing to the instructor, his/her Area Convener, the Dean, and the student. Any party to the case may appeal the decision to the Dean’s Council, which remains the final court of appeals. The Dean’s Council will examine written materials submitted to the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum and come to a final decision meeting in Executive session.

The Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum, which reviews all grade changes (except in the case of faculty changing an NR to a regular grade, which can be approved by the Registrar and the Deans), may also decide against a change recommended by an instructor. In that case, the instructor may initiate a final appeal to the Dean’s Council, which will resolve the question meeting in Executive session.

The sequence of any appeal can be outlined as follows:
a. to Instructor
b. to Convener
c. to Area
d. review by anonymous outside reader (optional)
e. to Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum
f. to Dean’s Council

Time Limit: Any appeal of a grade must be made within the semester immediately following its assignment.

XV. Language Requirements

Ph.D. Candidates

  • A candidate for the Ph.D. who is required to pass a language exam  may not begin capstone essays without having passed exam
  • Candidates for the Ph.D. degree are expected to demonstrate a scholar’s reading competence in the languages required by their Areas as follows:
  • History and Culture: Students who are concentrating in continental European history must pass one of the following: French, German, Italian, Spanish, or Russian.
  • If another language is deemed relevant to the student’s program, the student may petition for a substitution, which requires the recommendation of the History and Culture Area and the approval of the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum.
  • Additional rights of Areas pertinent to Languages
    By virtue of the role played by languages in the several disciplines, a given Area may: Require competence in additional languages and determine how such competence is to be demonstrated. Propose the texts to be used by candidates in its Area;

Level of Proficiency Required in Language Examinations
 

  • The candidate must be able to use the language as a dependable tool. A qualifying examination shall show understanding of the essential content of the passage at hand and shall avoid misconstruing the essential argument of the text that has been translated. No thought or idea is to be left out, added or changed. It is not required that the candidate demonstrate an ability to translate without error or write a polished translation; it is expected that the translation will make sense in English and will show understanding of common idioms, grammar, syntax, and technical vocabulary appropriate to the candidate’s field.

Language Substitution

  • On recommendation of the candidate’s Area and approval by the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum, a candidate may substitute another language, normally a modern language for one of the languages prescribed, when the faculty of the Area deems such a language especially relevant to the candidate’s program of study, including the dissertation.The initiative for substitution lies with the student; the means is by petition. Petitions are addressed to the Area and referred for final approval to the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum.

The following criteria will be the basis for the Area’s determination of the legitimacy of such petitions:

  • the scholarly value of the proposed substitute language, that is to say:
  • the importance of the subject matter for which the language will be used in research; and
  • (b) the location of the literary corpus that is to be employed in such research:
  • the student’s knowledge of the proposed language;
  • whether the Caspersen School has funds to employ qualified scholars outside its faculty to supervise research in the substituted language.

Examinations in foreign languages

  • Demonstration of a scholar’s reading competence in a foreign language is by written examination only, administered by the Caspersen School of Graduate Studies at Drew University, normally in S. W. Bowne Hall.
  • Every student in the Caspersen School will take the same authorized examinations, namely, those examinations administered by the Caspersen School.
  • A student may sit no more than three times per language.
  • On rare occasions, when genuine hardship is involved, language examinations may be taken in absentia, but only under strict proctoring, and only upon petition to the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum. The expense in engaging a proctor suitable to the Caspersen School must be borne by the student.
  • The administration of language examinations and their grading will be the responsibility of the staff of the Caspersen School Office, as follows: the Office will reproduce passages for an examination; the Office will oversee the examinations; the Office will send the examination papers to the readers will record the results, and will notify students and the Registrar.
  • Any printed translation tools may be brought to a language examination except previously translated practice examinations. Electronic translation devices, cell phones and briefcases may not be brought into the examination room.
  • Sanctions for cheating in a foreign language examination are specified in the Regulations on Academic Integrity.
  • Grading of language examinations will be done by agents of the Caspersen School of Graduate Studies, at the direction of the Dean of the Caspersen School and his/her staff.
  • When possible, the first reading will be made by members of the language departments of the College of Liberal Arts, chosen by the Dean of the Caspersen School and his/her staff, preferably persons who have not been involved in the instruction of Graduate students.
  • In the event that there is not a member of the language departments of the College of Liberal Arts in the examination language who has not been involved in the instruction of Graduate students, an appropriate and qualified reader will be chosen by the Dean of the Caspersen School and his/her staff from among University faculty outside of the language departments when possible, or from outside the University when necessary.
  • Exams will be submitted anonymously and scored by their reader as either “passing,” or “fail.”
  • In the event that a student should wish to appeal a score given to his/her exam, or at the discretion of the Dean, the exam will be sent to a second reader chosen by the Dean of the Caspersen School and his/her staff according to the above guidelines for evaluation.
  • Split decisions will be resolved by the two readers involved, or in the case of impasse, a third reader will be utilized.
  • Results of language examinations will normally be reported to students and the Registrar within three weeks of an examination.
  • Language examinations taken, passed and formally noted in the student’s record at other institutions are accepted in lieu of the examinations administered by the Caspersen School, at the discretion of each Area on a case by case basis. This substitution is only permitted after a first language has been passed at Drew and is available to doctoral candidates only.

Failure of a language exam.

A student who fails an exam may retake the exam without petition.

On the third failure of a given exam, the Caspersen School of Graduate Studies office shall report the failure to the Convener of the student’s Area.

The Area is then obligated to review the student’s status and to bring a recommendation to the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum such as the following:
(1) That the student be required to withdraw;
(2) That the student be granted a terminal M.A.;
(3) That the student will be involuntarily withdrawn from the program
(4) That the student be permitted to take the exam a fourth time upon demonstrating an appropriate plan of action.

If the student fails the fourth time, involuntary withdrawal from the program is automatic. However, if the Area is firmly convinced of that student’s scholarly potential, the Area may appeal the automatic involuntary withdrawal of student status and request the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum to approve a final retake. It states the grounds for this appeal in a letter to the Committee. If the Committee grants the retake, a member of the language faculty shall review the last failed exam. He/she may choose an appropriate alternative to the language exam, such as an oral examination on an assigned text conducted by a language instructor. Such an oral examination will be both thorough and comprehensive.

Non-native speakers of English
As English is the language of instruction in the Caspersen School, all students are expected to be fluent in English as a condition of their matriculation.

XVI. PH.D. Capstone essays

Capstone Essays:

                The following procedures should guide your preparation for and submittal of the capstone essays—the major component of the 3rd Year Portfolio:

1. All capstone essays and the capstone petition must be submitted through the graduate dean’s office.  Otherwise, we have no means of tracking the student’s progress. 

Once the student has submitted the essay electronically in .pdf or .doc format to the graduate dean’s office, the essay will be logged and forwarded to the appropriate readers. The readers will return a simple grade of NQ (Not Qualified), Q (Qualified), or QD (Qualified with Distinction) via e-mail to the graduate dean’s office only.  The graduate dean’s office will inform the student. No interim reports or grades should be provided to the students by their readers. 

2. Grading of the capstone essays is blind: even though students know who their readers are, they should not know how each reader scores their essay.  This is necessary in cases where one reader may Q an essay and another may NQ it.  In cases where one reader NQs an essay, it will be assigned to a third reader by the Dean, per CSGS regulations.  Hence the importance of maintaining the blind protocol– for the student’s and the readers’ sakes.

In cases where a student does not pass an essay, he or she has up to two (2) opportunities to revise and resubmit each essay to achieve a qualifying mark. It is appropriate for the readers to provide guidance on required improvements once the student has been informed of her/his failing mark. It is up to the reader or readers to decide how they wish to provide the guidance at this point– by note or in person. Normally, a student will not be informed of a failing mark until a third reader has read the essay. 

3. Submission of the capstone essay is a formal process following preparation; it is not a final paper following draft submissions and revisions.  Students should meet several times with the first reader (and second if so desired), to develop a bibliography and discuss readings.  Students should not be submitting draft capstone essays to their readers for review and suggested revisions. This defeats the purpose of the capstone.   

4. The capstone essays are historiographical essays (the term will be different in other fields but the general intent is the same) from 30 to 40 pages in length.  They are not research papers nor are they bibliographic essays. The function of the capstone essays is to develop the student’s knowledge of and ability to succinctly discuss a problem, theme, major concepts, methods, and/or relevant literature in a particular scholarly field or subfield.  The emphasis given each of these elements is up to the readers in conversation with the student. Michael Ballagh and Jennifer Hillman Helgren of Claremont Graduate University offer guidelines and links to examples here: http://www.cgu.edu/pages/840.asp

5. The capstone essays should be differentiated and not variations on the same topic: the first capstone should be a broad topic in intellectual and/or cultural history; the second should be a topic in a historical field other than intellectual or cultural history; the third should be an interdisciplinary topic engaging historical studies and an outside field.  This structure supports the capstones’ role in the program which is twofold: first, to help students prepare for their dissertation projects; and second, to help them develop multiple fields of expertise, in order to develop their scholarly and teaching portfolio to the broadest extent possible. 

6. Students should be encouraged to develop as wide a reader list as possible: it is not in the student’s interest to restrict him or herself to a limited number of readers. Both to support item 5 above, and to provide the student with as many perspectives as possible on scholarship and academic performance, it is good for the student to develop a diverse “palette” of readers. 

7. Coursework should support the capstones– not exclusively, but to a fair degree: Advisors should take this into account when recommending coursework to first and second-year students.  What will the interdisciplinary field possibly be, and has the student taken a seminar in that field?  What other-than intellectual and cultural history field does the student wish to pursue (and has the advisor discussed historical fields with the student)?

8. Per CSGS Regulation Section V.2, professors are not available during the summer months to discuss and read capstone essays.  The same holds true for dissertations and research tutorials.  This time is reserved for their own scholarship and most professors hold 9-month contracts. Exceptions may be permitted by individual professors and for hardship cases.  But students should be aware of the general rule when preparing their capstone petition. 

For each of these essays, the student will master, summarize, and criticize a body of historical literature. 

XVII. Capstone essay Requirements. History and Culture Area

Capstone Essays

All doctoral students are required to write three capstone essays in the third year of their graduate studies. For each of these essays, the student will master, summarize,and criticize a body of historical literature. The essays should address the following three fields:

Field 1: Intellectual and cultural history.
Field 2: A specialized field in history other than intellectual/cultural history.

Examples include political history, diplomatic history, disability history, social
history, or any other subfield supported by the teaching and research expertise of
the History and Culture faculty.

Field 3: An interdisciplinary field that explores the intersections between history
and another discipline, such as literary studies, classics, anthropology, political
science, sociology, art history, or economics.

The final essay itself should be 30-40 pp. of text, plus a complete bibliography.

 

XVIII. Master’s Research Tutorial and Thesis

Master of Arts Research Tutorial
All MA and PhD students must register for the Research Tutorial (HC 990),
normally in their last semester of course work. In this course, the student will write a
publishable research paper based on primary sources that will qualify as an MA thesis.
When registering for the Research Tutorial, the student should fill out and submit a
tutorial petition, which is available on line: http://www.drew.edu/graduate/files/Tutorialfor-all-CS-programs-2010.pdf
The student should begin the tutorial by drafting a proposal, which should include a detailed summary of the proposed research project, a preliminary thesis, a description
of the methodology to be used, and a bibliography of primary and secondary sources.
The proposal should be no more than 5 pages in length and must be approved by the instructor within the first two weeks of the semester.
The final paper should be 30-40 pages in length. It should include a title page, endnotes (rather than footnotes), and a bibliography. Tables, charts, and figures are optional. Follow the MLA Handbook or Chicago Manual of Style. Use the Times New Roman font throughout, 10 point for endnotes, 12 point for everything else. Leave 1-inch margins on all four sides. Do not justify your right margin. The text must be typed double-spaced with the following exceptions: block quotations, endnotes, and bibliography items may be single-spaced. Submit one copy of the final draft to your faculty supervisor, as well as an e-copy to the Caspersen School office.

Master of Letters Thesis

The thesis is a traditional academic research project of approximately 50-75 pages in length. Due to the size and scope of the thesis project, creative M. Litt. theses are generally not permitted.

Students considering application to the Doctor of Letters program are strongly encouraged to write the thesis.

The thesis involves the participation of a faculty advisor chosen by the student in consultation with the Caspersen School Dean. The advisor must be a member of the Drew Arts and Letters faculty and agree to accept the assignment.

The thesis topic should develop from interdisciplinary coursework taken at Drew.

The thesis counts as three (3) credit hours and is billed at that rate.The M.Litt. Thesis Process:

Registration: Students in the thesis track must complete 27 hours of coursework prior to registering for Thesis Preparation (ARLET 990).
Note: Students intending to write the thesis should be alert to potential topics as they proceed through course work.

Thesis Proposal:
a. In the semester prior to registering for Thesis Prep, students must present the Dean with a Thesis Proposal (see Form 1 in Appendix C). The Thesis Proposal consists of:
Statement of Topic
150-200 word overview of the topic
Suggested Thesis Director
This proposal must be presented to the Caspersen School Office at least two weeks prior to meeting with the Dean.
b. After submitting the proposal, the student will meet with the Dean to discuss it. After approving the proposal, the Dean, in consultation with the student and Program Director, appoints the Thesis Committee members. The committee members must agree to accept the assignment.
c. After approval from the Dean, the student then meets with the Director to discuss and outline the Thesis Project.

Development of the Thesis
In consultation with the Director, the student should:
a. define the project;
b. define the scholarly methodology to be used;
c. develop an outline;
d. assemble a bibliography;
e. write the thesis following the style guidelines and requirements of the Caspersen School for the M.Litt. thesis.

Thesis drafts: Students should schedule submission of drafts so that the reader has a minimum of three weeks to review and respond.

Style Guidelines: Students are responsible for following approved style guidelines, preferably those outlined in Turabian’s A Manual for Writers or MLA Handbook or APA-Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Students should also refer to Appendix D at the end of these Regulations for thesis guidelines specific to the Caspersen School.

Final reading and Grade: The thesis completes the degree requirements for graduation only when the Committee approves the final copy and submits a grade report.

Format Review: After the defense, all students must see the Administrative Assistant in the Dean’s Office regarding the final submission of the dissertation. Time Limit: All requirements for the M.Litt. degree must be fulfilled within a period of two years after the student satisfactorily completes 27 hours of course work in the program.

Master of Medical Humanities

The M.M.H. thesis demonstrates a student’s competence in research, interpretation and exposition of a concept that makes an original contribution to human thought and relations. This thesis will be 50-75 pages in length. It is the normal method of completing the student’s course work in the program and should evolve from that work and the Clinical Practicum.

Candidates will be expected to evidence creativity and disciplined study in the dissertation that should evolve from the student’s coursework in the program.

The thesis counts as three (3) credit hours and is charged at that rate.M.M.H. Thesis process

Registration:
Upon completion of the 27 credit hours of course work required for the degree, the student will register for the Thesis Preparation (MEDHM 990) and fill out a Thesis Preparation form (Form 1 in Appendix C).

Selection of the Thesis Topic:
The topic of the directed study project is chosen by the student with the Program Director’s approval. The project should grow out of the student’s clinical experience.

Development of the Project/Thesis:
In consultation with the Director, the student should:
a. define the project;
b. define the scholarly methodology to be used;
c. develop an outline;
d. assemble a bibliography;
e. write the thesis following the style guidelines and requirements of the Caspersen School for the M.M.H.

Thesis drafts: Students should schedule submission of drafts so that the adviser has a minimum of three weeks to review and respond.

Style Guidelines: Students are responsible for following approved style guidelines, preferably those outlined in Turabian’s A Manual for Writer, the MLA Handbook, or the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA). Students should also refer to Appendix D at the end of these Regulations for thesis guidelines specific to the Caspersen School.

Final reading and Grade: The thesis completes the degree requirements for graduation only when the adviser approves the final copy and submits a grade report.

Format Review: After final approval, all students must see the Administrative Assistant in the Dean’s office regarding the final submission of the.

Time Limit: All requirements for the M.M. H. degree must be fulfilled within a period of two years after the student satisfactorily completes 27 hours of course work in the program.

XIX. Doctoral Dissertations

Doctor of Philosophy Dissertation:
A dissertation demonstrating the student’s ability to perform and creatively to interpret advanced research is an essential requirement of the doctorate. The student should expect that it will take at least a year of full-time work to research and write the dissertation.

First Steps

The selection of a dissertation topic and preliminary definition and exploration of that topic may commence at any time in the student’s graduate program.

After all capstone essays have been passed, the student should discuss the proposed dissertation project with the professor (not necessarily the current academic adviser) likely to be the dissertation committee chair. The student must register for two semesters (one semester in M.H.L.) of dissertation research (18 credits total).

After the student and professor have mutually chosen the other two potential members of the dissertation committee, the student should ask those who are members of the Drew Graduate Faculty whether they are willing to serve. In the case where a scholar from outside Drew is proposed, the Dean invites that person once the committee is approved, dependent on budgetary constraints.

The student submits a completed dissertation committee form to the Caspersen School Office, from which it is sent to the Area for action.

If the Area approves the committee, it is sent to the Dean for final approval. If the Area does not approve the proposed committee, it will recommend further discussion among interested parties. At any point in the process, if problems arise, the student, or members of the committee, may bring the matter to the attention of the Area or the Dean and request assistance in solving the matter. Should such negotiations fail to bring about a resolution satisfactory to all parties, the Dean will make the final decision on the membership of the dissertation committee. If, for any reason, a faculty member leaves a dissertation committee, the Dean, in consultation with the Area and the student, makes the arrangements for a new reader.

The Prospectus

The student shall develop a dissertation prospectus in consultation with the Dissertation Committee. The prospectus must follow the standards outlined in the “Guide for Writing the Prospectus” (available in the Caspersen School website).

  • The student is required to meet with the Dissertation Committee to discuss a full draft of the prospectus. The draft must be submitted to the Committee at least two weeks prior to the proposed meeting. (If the Dissertation Committee includes an off-campus member, the student must submit the draft to that member prior to the meeting with the on-campus members. The off-campus member will be invited to participate by conference call or to submit comments to be a part of the discussion at the meeting in the event that person cannot attend the meeting.) If the prospectus is not approved, it may be revised and resubmitted. If it is not approved upon the second submission, it will be sent to the full Area for final action.

Final reading of, and oral examination of, the dissertation

  • The dissertation, in final form, shall be submitted by the Ph.D. candidate to his/her committee  for the purpose of final reading and oral examination. The deadlines are set in the Caspersen School calendar. Faculty time is protected from the end of May until the first of September according to the terms of the Regulations.
  • On receipt of the dissertation in final form, the Administrative Assistant should be notified by the student that the document has been submitted to the Dissertation Committee.
  • A ballot will be attached to each copy of the dissertation in final form. Each member of the Dissertation Committee must mark and return a ballot, stating whether or not the dissertation is ready for examination. If the three members of the Dissertation Committee agree that the dissertation is ready for examination, and so indicate on the ballots provided, then the student proceeds to arrange a day and time for an oral defense. Once the date and time are established with the Committee members, the Administrative Assistant reserves a place where the defense will take place. If the Dissertation Committee reports two negative judgments, the dissertation will be considered not ready for examination.
  • On receipt of all three ballots, and only then, does the Dean’s Office authorize an oral defense. The chair of the Dissertation Committee will receive the “Oral Examination Certificate” used by the Committee in an oral defense. Arrangements for an oral defense of a dissertation–reserving the room, inviting the community–shall be made by the Administrative Assistant of the Caspersen School.

The examiners will hear the candidate’s defense and reach a judgment by majority vote in accordance with the following schedule of evaluations:

  • Pass: Certain minor typographical and/or stylistic changes may be required.
  • Pass with Major Revisions: The dissertation is essentially sound, and the candidate shows strength in its defense, but a section may need to be recast or more extensively elaborated. Such revision must be approved by the original Dissertation Committee.
  • Pass with Distinction: The Dissertation Committee may recommend to the Graduate Faculty that “Distinction” be recorded on the student’s transcript.
  • Fail: Submission of re-written or new dissertation permissible. This is a clear failure; however, the committee will advise the student how this judgment is to be construed in his/her case.
  • Final Fail: No provision for resubmission.

In cases where a dissertation has been rejected at the Ph.D. level, the Area shall meet with the examiners to recommend to the Faculty whether (a) the dissertation is acceptable for a terminal M.A. or (b) the dissertation is to be rejected as unacceptable at any level.

Format Review: Prior to the defense, all students must see the Administrative Assistant regarding the final submission of the dissertation.

Degree Conferral Requirements: The student must: (1) submit to the Library website the dissertation that complies fully with the Regulations of the Caspersen School and the “Dissertation Guidelines”; (2) sign the Release form for ProQuest; (3) provide a copy of the title page and vita to the CSGS Dean’s office; and (4) pay all fees.

Time Limit: All requirements for the Ph.D. degree must be fulfilled within a period of five years after the student satisfactorily completes 36 hours of coursework in the program.

 

Doctor of Letters Dissertation

The dissertation demonstrates a student’s competence in research, interpretation and exposition of a concept that normally makes a meaningful contribution to human thought and relations. This dissertation will be 150-220 pages in length. It is the normal method of completing the student’s course work in the program and should evolve from that course work.

Creative dissertations:

  • Under exceptional circumstances, students may petition to undertake creative projects as their dissertations. These students are strongly urged to complete, but not exceed, The Writing Concentration. Students should be aware that the creative dissertation must have a 30-40 page scholarly framework consisting of an introduction that places the work in its historic, academic, and cultural context.
  • Students considering creative dissertations must make special application to the Dean (see Form 2 in Appendix C) and must provide three writing samples in the proposed genre of the dissertation as well as a rationale for writing a creative dissertation. The Dean will then forward these materials to the Creative Dissertation Review Committee, which will advise the Dean. The Caspersen School Dean and Review Committee reserve the right to deny or request modification of creative dissertation applications. Please contact the Program Director with any additional questions.

The Dissertation Committee consists of a Director and a Second Reader, who are generally members of the Drew Caspersen School Faculty.

Candidates will be expected to evidence creativity and disciplined study in the dissertation, which should evolve from the student’s coursework in the program.

The dissertation counts as nine (9) credit hours and is charged at that rate.The D.Litt. Dissertation Process:

Registration: Students entering the program prior to June 2012 must complete 30hours of course work prior to registering for Dissertation Preparation (ARLET 999). Students entering the program after June 2012 must complete 36 hours of course work prior to registering for Dissertation Preparation (ARLET 999).

Dissertation Proposal:

In the semester prior to registering for Dissertation Prep, the student must present the Dean with a Dissertation Proposal (form on CSGS website) or a Creative Dissertation Application (form on CSGS website). The Dissertation Proposal and the Creative Dissertation Application consist of:
 

  • Statement of Topic
  • 150-200 word overview of the topic and suggested committee members.
    This proposal must be presented to the Caspersen School Office at least two weeks prior to meeting with the Dean.
  • After submitting proposal, the student will meet with the Dean to discuss it. During this meeting, the Dean, in consultation with the student and Program Director, appoints the Dissertation Committee members. In most cases, the student is responsible for contacting the proposed committee members. The committee members must agree to accept the assignment.
  • Dissertation Prospectus: After approval from the Dean, the student then meets with the Committee to discuss the project and prospectus. The student must prepare a prospectus proposal in consultation with the Committee.

The prospectus provides:

  • a tentative title
  • a description of the topic
  • a survey of existing discussions, if any
  • an overview of the controlling argument and approach
  • a summary of research materials and methods
  • a preliminary bibliography
  • proposed outline

The prospectus proposal must be submitted to the committee at least 30 days prior to the required meeting of the Committee and the student. At the required prospectus meeting, the director and reader will raise questions and make suggestions for revising the draft prospectus. The student must then rework the proposal.

  • When the Committee has approved the prospectus, the student will submit one copy, accompanied by the Prospectus Cover Sheet (form on CSGS website), to the Caspersen School Office.
  • In certain circumstances, the prospectus may be subject to final approval by the Dean. The Dean reserves to right to request that the student revisit or revise the prospectus. Otherwise, the student may proceed with the project.
  • Additional information on the prospectus, including detailed guidelines, are available on the CSGS website and in the Caspersen School Office.

Dissertation drafts: Students should schedule submission of dissertation drafts so that readers have a minimum of three weeks to review and respond.

Style Guidelines: Students are responsible for following approved style guidelines, preferably those outlined in Turabian’s A Manual for Writers or the MLA Handbook.

Final Reading: The student submits the final form of the dissertation to the Dissertation Committee for final reading. The student should notify the administrative assistant that the document has been submitted. A ballot will be sent to each member of the Dissertation Committee who must mark and return a ballot, stating whether or not the dissertation is ready for examination. If the Committee does not agree, it directs the student to make the necessary changes. If both Committee members agree that the dissertation is ready for examination, then the student proceeds to arrange a day and time for the oral defense. Once the date and time are established with the Committee members, the Administrative Assistant reserves a space where the defense will take place. For May commencement, the deadline for final reading is the first working day of March; for August commencement, it is the first working day of July; for December commencement, it is the first working day of November.

Oral Examination: After the oral defense, the Committee judges the dissertation and defense as:
 

  • Pass: Certain minor typographical and/or stylistic changes may be required.
  • Pass with Major Revisions: The dissertation is essentially sound, and the candidate shows strength in its defense, but a section may need to be recast or more extensively elaborated. Such revision must be approved by the original Dissertation Committee.
  • Pass with Distinction: The Dissertation Committee may recommend to the Caspersen School Faculty that “Distinction” be recorded on the student’s transcript.
  • Fail: Submission of re-written or new dissertation permissible. This is a clear failure; however, the Committee will advise the student how this judgment is to be construed in his/her case.
    Final Fail: No provision for re-submission.

 

Should a Committee fail to agree on a dissertation, the Dean will appoint a third reader who will make a final determination.

Required Abstract and Vita Form: A copy of a 350-word abstract of the dissertation and Vita form must be submitted to the Administrative Assistant in the Dean’s Office no later than the date of the oral defense.

Format Review: After the defense, all students must see the Administrative Assistant regarding the final submission of the dissertation.

Degree Conferral Requirements: The student must: (1) submit to the Library website the dissertation that complies fully with the Regulations of the Caspersen School and the “Dissertation Guidelines”; (2) sign the Release form for ProQuest; (3) provide a copy of the title page and vita to the CSGS Dean’s office; and (4) pay all fees.

Time Limit: All requirements for the Ph.D. degree must be fulfilled within a period of five years after the student satisfactorily completes 36 hours of coursework in the program.

Doctor of Medical Humanities Dissertation

The D.M.H. dissertation demonstrates a student’s competence in research, interpretation and exposition of a concept that normally makes a meaningful contribution to human thought and relations. This dissertation will be 150-220 pages in length. It is the normal method of completing the student’s course work in the program and should evolve from that work and the Clinical Practicum.

The Dissertation Committee consists of the Director and a Second Reader, each of whom is generally a member of the Drew Caspersen School Faculty.

Candidates will be expected to evidence creativity and disciplined study in the dissertation, which should evolve from the student’s coursework in the program.

The dissertation counts as nine (9) credit hours and is charged at that rate.
The D.M.H. Dissertation Process:

Registration: Students entering the program prior to June 2005 must complete 27 hours of course work prior to registering for Dissertation Preparation (MDHM 999). Students entering the program after June 2005 must complete 30 hours of course work prior to registering for Dissertation Preparation (MDHM 999). Students enrolling after June 2015/6 must complete 36 hours of course work prior to registering for Dissertation Preparation (MDHM 999)

Dissertation Proposal:

In the semester prior to registering for Dissertation Prep, the student must present the Dean with a Dissertation Proposal (form on CSGS website) or a Creative Dissertation Application (form on CSGS website). The Dissertation Proposal and the Creative Dissertation Application consist of:
 

  • Statement of Topic
  • 150-200 word overview of the topic and suggested committee members.
    This proposal must be presented to the Caspersen School Office at least two weeks prior to meeting with the Dean.
  • After submitting proposal, the student will meet with the Dean to discuss it. During this meeting, the Dean, in consultation with the student and Program Director, appoints the Dissertation Committee members. In most cases, the student is responsible for contacting the proposed committee members. The committee members must agree to accept the assignment.
  • Dissertation Prospectus: After approval from the Dean, the student then meets with the Committee to discuss the project and prospectus. The student must prepare a prospectus proposal in consultation with the Committee.

The prospectus provides:

  • a tentative title
  • a description of the topic
  • a survey of existing discussions, if any
  • an overview of the controlling argument and approach
  • a summary of research materials and methods
  • a preliminary bibliography
  • proposed outline

The prospectus proposal must be submitted to the committee at least 30 days prior to the required meeting of the Committee and the student. At the required prospectus meeting, the director and reader will raise questions and make suggestions for revising the draft prospectus. The student must then rework the proposal.

  • When the Committee has approved the prospectus, the student will submit one copy, accompanied by the Prospectus Cover Sheet (form on CSGS website), to the Caspersen School Office.
  • In certain circumstances, the prospectus may be subject to final approval by the Dean. The Dean reserves to right to request that the student revisit or revise the prospectus. Otherwise, the student may proceed with the project.
  • Additional information on the prospectus, including detailed guidelines, are available on the CSGS website and in the Caspersen School Office.

Dissertation drafts: Students should schedule submission of dissertation drafts so that readers have a minimum of three weeks to review and respond.

Style Guidelines: Students are responsible for following approved style guidelines, preferably those outlined in Turabian’s A Manual for Writers or the MLA Handbook.

Final Reading: The student submits the final form of the dissertation to the Dissertation Committee for final reading. The student should notify the administrative assistant that the document has been submitted. A ballot will be sent to each member of the Dissertation Committee who must mark and return a ballot, stating whether or not the dissertation is ready for examination. If the Committee does not agree, it directs the student to make the necessary changes. If both Committee members agree that the dissertation is ready for examination, then the student proceeds to arrange a day and time for the oral defense. Once the date and time are established with the Committee members, the Administrative Assistant reserves a space where the defense will take place. For May commencement, the deadline for final reading is the first working day of March; for August commencement, it is the first working day of July; for December commencement, it is the first working day of November.

Oral Examination: After the oral defense, the Committee judges the dissertation and defense as:
 

  • Pass: Certain minor typographical and/or stylistic changes may be required.
  • Pass with Major Revisions: The dissertation is essentially sound, and the candidate shows strength in its defense, but a section may need to be recast or more extensively elaborated. Such revision must be approved by the original Dissertation Committee.
  • Pass with Distinction: The Dissertation Committee may recommend to the Caspersen School Faculty that “Distinction” be recorded on the student’s transcript.
  • Fail: Submission of re-written or new dissertation permissible. This is a clear failure; however, the Committee will advise the student how this judgment is to be construed in his/her case.
    Final Fail: No provision for re-submission.

 

Should a Committee fail to agree on a dissertation, the Dean will appoint a third reader who will make a final determination.

Required Abstract and Vita Form: A copy of a 350-word abstract of the dissertation and Vita form must be submitted to the Administrative Assistant in the Dean’s Office no later than the date of the oral defense.

Format Review: After the defense, all students must see the Administrative Assistant regarding the final submission of the dissertation.

Degree Conferral Requirements: The student must: (1) submit to the Library website the dissertation that complies fully with the Regulations of the Caspersen School and the “Dissertation Guidelines”; (2) sign the Release form for ProQuest; (3) provide a copy of the title page and vita to the CSGS Dean’s office; and (4) pay all fees.

Time Limit: All requirements for the Ph.D. degree must be fulfilled within a period of five years after the student satisfactorily completes 36 hours of coursework in the program.

 

XX. Customs of an M.A. or Doctoral Defense

Both the defense of an M.A. thesis and the defense of a doctoral dissertation shall be open to members of the faculty of Drew University, to students of the Caspersen School of Drew University, and to what members of the public the candidate chooses to invite.

  • Normally, such defenses will be conducted in the Thompson Graduate Commons in S.W. Bowne Hall.
  • The Examining Committee will meet privately before and after the public defense–before, to review the candidate’s academic record and to talk over the procedures to be used; after, to determine the outcome of the defense. The candidate is not present at either of those meetings.
  • It shall be at the discretion of each Examining Committee whether to permit questions to be put to the candidate from other members of the University faculty who are not on the Examining Committee.
  • Under very special circumstances, on written recommendation of a Dissertation or Thesis Committee, the Dean is empowered to declare an oral defense private, in which case only the candidate and the Committee are permitted to attend.

XXI. Graduate Academic Assistantships

In April of each year the Dean of the Caspersen School shall receive advice from the Areas concerning the appointment of Academic Assistants. These appointments are designed to provide exceptional students with teaching and/or practical research experience under faculty mentorship. Appointments within the program are limited to duly registered students of good standing in the Caspersen School. Compensation is determined year by year in relation to the availability of funds.

XXII. Scholarship Awards and Financial Assistance

Annually, the Caspersen School affords merit scholarships covering full tuition for incoming students. The scholarships are named for individuals whose contributions to the life of the Caspersen School are honored in this way:
The Barbara and Finn Caspersen Scholarship
The John W. Bicknell Scholarship
The Robert G. Smith Scholarship
The Shirley Sugerman Scholarship
The Graduate School Scholarship
These scholarships are awarded upon recommendation to the Dean by the Conveners of the several Areas.

The Caspersen School also appoints a class of “Dean’s Scholars” each year. These appointments are awarded to incoming students of exceptional academic promise. They carry scholarships equal to 85% of tuition.

All these scholarships are given on the basis of academic merit alone. Apart from added stipends, all such awards are applied to tuition payments and may be used for no other purpose. They are awarded to full-time candidates for the Ph.D. degree and are renewable for the two remaining years in which the student owes tuition. They shall be forfeited if, in the judgment of the Dean of the Caspersen School and the faculty members on the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum, the candidate fails to evidence meritorious progress toward the degree as measured by grades in course and by language and capstone essays passed in a timely fashion.

Living expense stipends, or book purchase stipends, may, or may not, be added to merit scholarships. Such stipends are limited to a maximum of five years for any student.

All other grants-in-aid offered in the Caspersen School will be based on two criteria, that the applicant will be asked to demonstrate fully: (1) financial need and (2) academic performance.

No one in default status on previous student loans is eligible for Drew financial assistance.

XXIII. Housing

  • Drew housing is assigned based upon the level of scholarship and then on a first-come, first-serve basis. Full-time students are given preference; part-time or maintaining matriculation students may be required to vacate Drew housing.

Time limitations for Occupancy of Drew Housing:

  • The University reserves the right to limit occupancy for M.A. candidates to two years, M.Litt., M.M.H. to two years and Ph.D., D.Litt., and D.M.H. candidates to four years.
  • The above limits include time in Drew housing for other Drew degree programs when credit for advanced standing is granted for work done in those programs. The time is calculated as follows: 1-3 courses advanced standing = 1 semester of housing time; 4-6 courses = 2 semesters.
  • Further, a student may be asked to withdraw from Drew housing after five years occupancy, regardless of what degree programs were taken during that time.
  • Notifying the Housing Office when vacating campus housing in the course of the academic year is an essential student responsibility.

XXIV. Policy Governing the Retention of Student Records

To avoid any suspicion that student records have been unlawfully destroyed, the Caspersen School publishes the following schedule pertaining to the retention of student records:

  • An academic folder will remain “active” until the student has been graduated or withdraws. Then it will become inactive and will be stored in the basement of S. W. Bowne for a period of an additional five years. Then it will be offered to the University Archives.
  • Capstone essays will be retained electronically for at least one year after their disposition by the Committee on Academic Standing and Curriculum.
  • Language examinations will be retained for one month after the grades are reported to the Graduate faculty
  • Proposals and prospectuses are kept in a student’s academic folder and are subject to conditions explained above.
  • All documents pertinent to financial aid are kept in the office of the Director of Financial Aid for seven years.

XXV. Transcripts and Dossiers

Transcripts of Drew students and graduates are mailed to other schools or potential employers at student or alumni/ae request only when financial records are clear and no outstanding bills are owed the University.

XXVI. Students with Disabilities

The Caspersen School of Graduate Studies at Drew University, in accord with the policies underlying Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and in compliance with the Association of Higher Education and Disability guidelines, works to ensure that reasonable accommodations are implemented for enrolled students with documented disability to function in an academic environment. The University acknowledges that the decision to self-identify is a personal matter and makes no pre-admission inquiry about a candidate’s disability.

Upon acceptance to a degree program and a minimum of one month prior to enrollment in classes, admitted students are encouraged to discuss the nature of their disability with and to submit documentation of their disability to the Department of Educational Affairs. This meeting may be arranged by contacting the office at 408-3327.

 

 

Master of Fine Arts in Poetry and Poetry in Translation  Regulations

Degree Courses of Study and Requirements
 

The Drew University Master of Arts in Poetry is a two-year, low-residency program
for poets and poet translators. We provide an intense immersion into poetry through
writing workshops, public readings, lectures, critical writing, and study plans
designed by each student with his/her mentor/poet. We offer three tracks, a track in
Poetry, a track in Poetry in Translation, and a combined MFA in Poetry & Poetry in
Translation (which requires an additional semester and an additional residency). The
Drew MFA Program in Poetry is committed to making sure that all students, no
matter which track they are on, are exposed to a broad range of poets and translators.
The MFA in Poetry requires the completion of four semesters and five residencies
for a total of 64 credits. Students study the craft of poetry by writing poems,
studying craft, reading extensively, and writing critically. Requirements include
attending five residencies and at the end of each residency completing an 8-10 page
residency essay. During the mentorship semester students are required to send four
packets over the course of the semester to their mentors. Each packet must include a
letter and reading summary, 4-6 new poems, revisions of poems, and 2 short papers.
During the third mentorship semester students write one 15-20 page essay instead of
the shorter essays. During the fourth and final semester students complete a
manuscript of original poems. Their final residency includes a senior presentation
and a senior reading.
 

The MFA in Translation program is designed to teach students about the different
models and schools of translation. Students receiving the MFA in Translation will
translate into English. They will be expected to attend all lectures at the residency in
order to understand the craft elements involved in writing poetry in English. The
degree requires the completion of four semesters and five residencies for a total of
64 credits. During the fourth semester students complete a manuscript of
translations. All of the requirements listed above for the MFA in Poetry are required
for translators.
 

The Combined MFA in Poetry and Poetry in Translation is designed for poets
who also want to study the art of translation. Given that many poets are, at
sometime, drawn to translation, both for the desire to understand and get at the heart
of poetry from another language, as well as to inspire and deepen their own work,
the study of translation is an important endeavor for any poet. The mission of the
Drew Program in Poetry in Translation is to bring to Drew students an awareness
and knowledge of poetry from all over the globe. All students will be exposed at
residencies to the lectures in translation as well as to guest translators.

To attain the combined MFA students pursue their own writing at the same time that they study
and practice translation. The combined degree requires that students complete five
semesters and six residencies for a total of 80 credits. During the fourth semester
students complete a manuscript of their own poems. During the fifth semester 3
students complete a manuscript of translations. During the course of their two years
students will work simultaneously on translation and original work. Their
requirements will be the same as above with the addition of the extra manuscript.
B. Students who apply to translate from one track into another are bound by the
regulations in force at the beginning of the semester in which they will begin the
new track.


IV. Definitions of Student Status
M.F.A. Candidates - MFA candidates are expected to be full-time students each
semester. The program involves taking 16 credits each semester. Attendance at the
residency and completion of each semester in good standing is required to move
forward in the program.

IX. Time Limits for Earning each Degree
 

All requirements for the Master of Fine Arts in Poetry and Poetry in Translation
degrees must be completed within a period of three years.
 

Upon written approval of the Dean, a student may take a leave of absence for a term
not to exceed one year. In special cases, a second one-year leave may be approved
by the Dean. Students requesting a leave of absence must meet with the Dean
before such a request will be approved and must obtain the signature of the
Associate Dean. The Dean of the Caspersen School is empowered to grant leaves of
absence on only three bases: (1) physical illness, (2) mental or emotional illness,
and (3) extreme financial difficulty. As the student pays no tuition or fees during a
leave of absence, he/she is not entitled to use any of the resources of the University:
library, faculty, housing, or grants-in-aid. Time spent in leaves of absence will not
be counted as part of the three-year time limitation for the M.F.A. Repayment for
any student loans must begin in a leave of absence, by federal regulation

Advanced Standing
Advanced Standing in the M.F.A. in Poetry and Poetry and Translation program will
be evaluated on a case-by-case basis by the director of the program in
consultation with the Academic Standing Committee.
 

XII. Academic Standards

  • The grading system
    The system of grading in the M.F.A. in Poetry and Poetry in Translation will be
    on a Satisfactory/Fail basis.
    Courses dropped between January 5, 2009 and March 27, 2009 are graded W
    (Withdrew); courses dropped after March 27, 2009 are graded F.
     
  • Satisfactory Academic Progress
    MFA candidates do not receive grades, but rather their work is evaluated as
    satisfactory or unsatisfactory. The progress of each student is monitored carefully by
    the mentor and director. A written evaluation by the student’s mentor at the mid-point
    in the semester, and then at the end of the semester, will outline the progress as well as
    determine whether the student has met all the requirements.
    The student will need to have attended the residency and all of the required events,
    including but not limited to workshops, lectures, readings, and individual meetings
    with the mentor. A residency essay must be turned in to the director. During the
    Mentorship semester, all four packets must be sent to the mentor with the material
    necessary to satisfy the requirements of the semester, including but not limited to
    poems, revisions of poems, papers, and a letter to the mentor. The mentor will decide
    whether or not the student has made satisfactory progress and has fulfilled all
    requirements. Should the faculty member be in doubt of a student’s work the director
    and faculty member will work closely to discern the best course of action.


    XV. Master’s Thesis (Poetry Manuscript)
    During the fourth semester poetry students will put together a manuscript of poetry. This
    manuscript should be approximately 48 pages; the pages should be numbered and there
    should be a table of contents. The mentor and second reader will evaluated the manuscript.
    During the fourth semester translation students will put together a manuscript of
    translations. This manuscript should be approximately 40 pages; the pages should be
    numbered and there should be a table of contents. The mentor and second reader will
    evaluate the manuscript.

    Students in the Combined MFA will complete a manuscript of original poems in their
    fourth semester; this manuscript should be approximately 48 pages; the pages should be
    numbered and there should be a table of contents. The mentor and second reader will
    evaluate the manuscript. In their fifth semester, students in the Combined MFA will
    complete a manuscript of translations. This manuscript should be approximately 40 pages;
    the pages should be numbered and there should be a table of contents. The mentor and
    second reader will evaluate the manuscript.

    XIX. Housing
    M.F.A. Residencies
    All M.F.A. students are required to live in residency housing (either off or on-campus during every residency throughout their program, and must abide by university rules. Students who wish to reside in a different location can appeal to the MFA program director.
     

HISTORY AND CULTURE STUDENT HANDBOOK

2016-2017

The Curriculum

The MA Program

The MA degree requires 27 credits (9 courses), including the Foundation Seminar. The ninth course should be the Research Tutorial, in which the student will write a publishable research paper that will qualify as an MA thesis.

The PhD Program

The requirements for the PhD include 36 credits (12 courses), a student portfolio, and a dissertation. Students admitted directly into the PhD program will receive an MA when they satisfactorily complete the Research Tutorial and eight other courses.

MA students may apply to the PhD program after they have satisfactorily completed at least two courses.  The applications forms and procedures are the same as for the MA program, and so is the deadline: February 1.  Applicants should obtain two reference letters from Drew faculty, submit as a writing sample a research paper from one of their Drew classes, and submit a new personal statement clearly stating a proposed area of research interest.

Required Courses

All PhD and MA students are required to take the Foundation Seminar (HC 800), normally in their first semester. This seminar will introduce students to the history, methods, and philosophy of historical writing.

All PhD and MA students must take a Research Tutorial (HC 990), normally in their final semester of course work, where each student will produce an original and publishable scholarly paper. The tutorial introduces students to primary source research and the apparatus of scholarship. Students in this tutorial work mainly independently but under faculty supervision.

All PhD students must take at least two extradisciplinary courses taught by faculty trained in fields other than history, including (but not limited to) literature, philosophy, politics, sociology, anthropology, music, art, and religion.  At least one extradisciplinary course should be taken in the student’s first year. A student may satisfy this requirement with courses offered in other Drew graduate programs or upper-level undergraduate courses, with the approval of his/her faculty advisor and the course instructor.

In their third year all PhD students will participate in a noncredit Writing Workshop taught by a professional nonfiction writer, which teaches academics how to communicate topics in history and culture to a general audience.

All PhD students should select elective courses in consultation with their advisors, with a view toward preparing for their Capstone Essays (see below).

MA students who are planning to translate to the PhD program should select courses with a view toward fulfilling the requirements for the PhD.

Eligible Courses

            Students may register for any course listed or crosslisted with the History and Culture program. With the approval of the faculty advisor, they may also take up to two non-crosslisted courses offered by Drew’s graduate Arts and Letters program, Graduate Division of Religion, Medical Humanities program, and undergraduate College of Liberal Arts, provided the course requirements meet History and Culture standards.  As a rough general rule, these courses should have a reading load of about 300 pages per week (or the equivalent in poetry, music, or art classes) and an overall writing load of 30 pages total.

Students may also take one Graduate Tutorial (TUTG 900).  When registering for TUTG 900, fill out and submit a Tutorial petition. (This and all other forms can be downloaded from http://www.drew.edu/graduate/deans-office/forms.)

In addition to their normal course load, students may informally audit other courses, with the approval of the instructor and the faculty advisor.  For example, some students may feel the need to fill in gaps in their basic historical knowledge by sitting in on undergraduate courses.  In such cases no formal registration is required, and students may do as much or as little course work as they wish.

Research Tutorial

All MA and PhD students must register for the Research Tutorial (HC 990), normally in their last semester of course work.   In this course, the student will write a publishable research paper based on primary sources that will qualify as an MA thesis.  When registering for the Research Tutorial, the student should fill out and submit a tutorial petition (http://www.drew.edu/graduate/deans-office/forms).

The student should begin the tutorial by drafting a proposal, which should include a detailed summary of the proposed research project, a preliminary thesis, a description of the methodology to be used, and a bibliography of primary and secondary sources.  The proposal should be no more than 5 pages in length and must be approved by the instructor within the first two weeks of the semester.

The final paper should be 30-40 pages in length. It should include a title page, endnotes (rather than footnotes), and a bibliography.  Tables, charts, and figures are optional.   Follow the MLA Handbook or Chicago Manual of Style.  Use the Times New Roman font throughout, 10 point for endnotes, 12 point for everything else.  Leave 1-inch margins on all four sides.  Do not justify your right margin.  The text must be typed double-spaced with the following exceptions:  block quotations, endnotes, and bibliography items may be single-spaced.  Submit one copy of the final draft to your faculty supervisor, as well as an e-copy to the Caspersen School office at jmontros@drew.edu.

Public Humanities Internships

The History and Culture program prepares all its students for academic careers, but we also go beyond that to engage the larger world.  The Public Humanities Internship (HC 805)  introduces students to alternative career possibilities for humanities scholars, and demonstrates how humanities scholarship can be mobilized outside of a traditional academic setting for socially productive ends.  This three-credit course will involve working with a humanities organization outside the university: for example, a museum, a publisher, a magazine, a foundation, or even a business corporation that can make use of a humanities scholar. 

Each internship must conclude with a product of some sort, such as a paper, report, or a project the intern worked on during his or her stay.  It should demonstrate a productive collaboration between humanities scholarship and a topic or venture of public concern.  The nature and scope of the product (which is analogous to a research paper in other graduate courses) should be discussed and agreed on by the student, the host organization, and the seminar instructor.  The instructor will evaluate the final product, which will have considerable weight in determining the student’s grade for the course.

As soon as you register for the course, contact Drew University’s Center for Career Development, which will help you secure an internship, in consultation with the seminar instructor.  Some internships pay modest stipends, which students can use to cover travel and other expenses.

Transfer Credits

          After they have satisfactorily completed their first academic year, doctoral students may apply to transfer graduate credits earned at other universities, up to a total of 6 credits (2 courses).  Applicants should submit to the Convenor an Advanced Standing Petition (http://www.drew.edu/graduate/deans-office/forms), along with copies of transcripts and course catalogue descriptions. Applications must be approved by both the Director and the Committee on Academic Standing.  Credits are only eligible for transfer (1) if they were earned within ten years of the student’s entry into the History and Culture program, (2) if the course addressed academic issues that engage the History and Culture program, and (3) if the student earned a grade of at least A-.

Academic Standards and Financial Aid

Graduate Academic Merit Scholarships range from 20-100% of annual tuition and are offered to incoming graduate students. Candidates for the scholarships are nominated by the area faculty in consultation with the Office of Financial Assistance and the Dean of the Caspersen School. To retain their scholarship, students must be enrolled full-time (nine credit hours per semester) and shall display meritorious progress toward the degree.

MA degree students must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA each semester and a cumulative minimum 3.00 GPA. Any student who fails to achieve this GPA minimum is placed on academic probation for one semester. If that student is placed on strict academic probation for the following semester, she/he may be ineligible for financial assistance. Full-time students are expected to complete the degree in four semesters. Drew’s financial aid awards are limited to a total of six semesters. All academic requirements for the degree must be completed within five years from the date of initial matriculation.

At the end of each academic year, all HC doctoral students will receive a letter assessing their overall academic performance. Doctoral students must maintain a 3.5 GPA each semester and a cumulative 3.5 GPA.  Upon review by HC faculty in consultation with the Dean, a doctoral student who fails to achieve the cumulative 3.5 GPA may be placed on academic probation for one semester.  If that doctoral student is placed on strict academic probation for the following semester, she/he may be ineligible for continued financial assistance at the initial level or may be ineligible for continued financial assistance.  This policy also applies to the stipends awarded to Fellows (see below). 

Foreign Languages

          See Section III.

Student Portfolios

          See Section III.

Dissertations

At the beginning of the third year, in consultation with his/her faculty advisor, each doctoral student will form a dissertation committee consisting of three faculty, one of whom may be based at another university.  Dissertation Guidelines may be found at http://www.drew.edu/graduate/deans-office/forms.

Each dissertation must ultimately undergo an oral defense and must be unanimously approved by the dissertation committee. When the student has prepared a final draft and is ready to defend, the committee will consult with the student to invite a fourth reader from another university.

II. Services and Resources

Faculty Advisors

            Faculty advisors are assigned to all incoming students.  Before registering for classes, students should always consult with their faculty advisors.  You can change advisors whenever you like: just make sure you have the permission of your new advisor, then inform the Associate Dean of the change.

Student Fellows

            A select number of our strongest doctoral students are History and Culture Fellows, who enjoy special benefits and have special responsibilities.  Fellows receive free tuition and a living stipend.  They must pursue their studies full-time, completing the MA and PhD in five years, and there may be some restrictions on accepting outside employment.  (There are no restrictions on outside employment for other students, who may study part-time, as few as one course per semester.)  In their second year, Fellows work as teaching assistants in Drew survey courses.  In their third year, they will teach their own courses at local colleges.

Professional Development Workshops

            Throughout the academic year the History and Culture program and the Graduate Division of Religion cosponsor a series of Professional Development Workshops for students.  These address the practical side of building an academic career: e.g., how to draft a CV, conduct a job interview, present a conference paper, apply for a grant, publish your research.  Attendance is voluntary, but bear in mind that these workshops offer much useful (indeed, essential) advice.

The History and Culture Colloquium

            Meeting about once a month, the History and Culture Colloquium showcases innovative research by Drew faculty and graduate students as well outside scholars.  Papers representing work-in-progress are precirculated to students and faculty and then, at the colloquium, are discussed with the authors.  Colloquia are open to all members of the Drew University community.  History and Culture students are strongly encouraged to attend.

Book Review Database

Book reviews that students write for classes can be posted onto the Moodle site “H&C reviews,” where they will be accessible to the Drew community and provide a valuable resource for other graduate students. You should submit your review to your instructor electronically, and provide a header in the following form: Author, Book Title (Place of Publication: Publisher, Date), number of pages. Review by Your Name.  

For example:

Eric T. Love, Race Over Empire: Racism and U.S. Imperialism, 1865-1900

(Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004). 245 pages.

Review by A. Student.

Conference and Dissertation Grants

            For students who are presenting papers at conferences, the Graduate Student Association will cover $400 up to twice a year, or $800 once a year. The Caspersen School may provide funding beyond that, but usually no more than a total of $750 a year. If available, the Caspersen School can also provide grants (usually up to $750) to support dissertation research trips, one per student.

​            Students should apply for travel to conference grants through the forms on the GSA page. For the dissertation travel grants, the form is on the Dean’s page. ​

The Third Year

            In the five-year History and Culture doctoral program, the third year is the “bridge.”  You have completed your coursework and have not yet begun researching your dissertation.  Nevertheless, there is much to do in this interval, which may well be your busiest year.  It requires careful planning and no slackening of self-discipline.  These guidelines should help you schedule your various responsibilities.

Writing Workshop

All third-year PhD students must enroll in HC 806: Writing as a Public Intellectual Workshop.  Offered annually in the spring semester and taught by a professional nonfiction writer, this seminar will teach academics how to communicate topics in history and culture to a general audience.

Foreign Languages

PhD students specializing in Continental Europe must pass an examination in one foreign language. Normally the language will be French, German, or Spanish, but another language may be substituted if it is deemed useful to the student’s research. Foreign language examinations are not required for MA students or for PhD students specializing in the United States, Britain, or Ireland.  To set up an examination, speak with Associate Dean Bill Rogers.

Student Portfolios

Each PhD student must, in the third academic year, demonstrate his/her preparation as a teacher and scholar by satisfactorily completing a portfolio which will consist of the following:

  • Three capstone essays.
  • A public lecture.
  • Two book reviews.
  • Two course syllabi.
  • An essay on an academic topic addressed to a nonacademic audience.

Your faculty advisor must submit a Portfolio Completion Form (http://www.drew.edu/graduate/deans-office/forms) certifying  that all elements of your portfolio have been satisfactorily completed by the end of your third year.  Here are the requirements for each of them:

Capstone Essays: See below.

Public Lecture: This lecture, on an academic topic, may be delivered to any audience: a scholarly conference, a church group, a fraternal organization, an adult education program, the Drew University community, or another college.  Ideally your faculty advisor should be in the audience, but at the very least he/she should read your text.

Two Book Reviews: You will probably write at least two book reviews in your coursework: submit the strongest of these.  If you prefer, you can write reviews expressly for your portfolio.  These reviews need not be published, but if you have published reviews in scholarly journals, by all means include them in your portfolio.  In fact we recommend that, as soon as possible, you start writing reviews for academic journals or websites (such as H-Net).  Ask your faculty advisor about the leading journals in your field, then send the editors your CV along with a cover letter offering your services as a reviewer and outlining your areas of expertise.

Two Course Syllabi: These can be syllabi you used in your student teaching (see below) or syllabi for a course you have yet to teach.

Essay for a Nonacademic Audience: This can be the essay you wrote for HC 806: Writing as a Public Intellectual Workshop.

 Capstone Essays:

                The following procedures should guide your preparation for and submittal of the capstone essays—the major component of the 3rd Year Portfolio:

1. All capstone essays and the capstone petition must be submitted through the graduate dean’s office.  Otherwise, we have no means of tracking the student’s progress. 

Once the student has submitted the essay electronically in .pdf or .doc format to the graduate dean’s office, the essay will be logged and forwarded to the appropriate readers. The readers will return a simple grade of NQ (Not Qualified), Q (Qualified), or QD (Qualified with Distinction) via e-mail to the graduate dean’s office only.  The graduate dean’s office will inform the student. No interim reports or grades should be provided to the students by their readers. 

2. Grading of the capstone essays is blind: even though students know who their readers are, they should not know how each reader scores their essay.  This is necessary in cases where one reader may give a final grade of Q on an essay and another may NQ it.  In cases where one reader NQs an essay, it will be assigned to a third reader by the Dean, per CSGS regulations.  Hence the importance of maintaining the blind protocol–for the student’s and the readers’ sakes.

In cases where a student does not pass an essay, he or she has up to two (2) opportunities to revise and resubmit each essay to achieve a qualifying mark. It is appropriate for the readers to provide guidance on required improvements once the student has been informed of her/his failing mark. It is up to the reader or readers to decide how they wish to provide the guidance at this point– by note or in person. Normally, a student will not be informed of a failing mark until a third reader has read the essay. 

3. Submission of the capstone essay is a formal process following preparation; it is not a final paper following draft submissions and revisions.  Students should meet several times with the first reader (and second if so desired), to develop a bibliography and discuss readings.  Students should not be submitting draft capstone essays to their readers for review and suggested revisions. This defeats the purpose of the capstone.   

4. The capstone essays are historiographical essays (the term will be different in other fields but the general intent is the same) from 30 to 40 pages in length.  They are not research papers nor are they bibliographic essays. The function of the capstone essays is to develop the student’s knowledge of and ability to succinctly discuss a problem, theme, major concepts, methods, and/or relevant literature in a particular scholarly field or subfield.  The emphasis given each of these elements is up to the readers in conversation with the student. Michael Ballagh and Jennifer Hillman Helgren of Claremont Graduate University offer guidelines and links to examples here: http://www.cgu.edu/pages/840.asp

5. The capstone essays should be differentiated and not variations on the same topic: the first capstone should be a broad topic in intellectual and/or cultural history; the second should be a topic in a historical field other than intellectual or cultural history; the third should be an interdisciplinary topic engaging historical studies and an outside field.  This structure supports the capstones’ role in the program which is twofold: first, to help students prepare for their dissertation projects; and second, to help them develop multiple fields of expertise, in order to develop their scholarly and teaching portfolio to the broadest extent possible. 

6. Students should be encouraged to develop as wide a reader list as possible: it is not in the student’s interest to restrict him or herself to a limited number of readers. Both to support item 5 above, and to provide the student with as many perspectives as possible on scholarship and academic performance, it is good for the student to develop a diverse “palette” of readers. 

7. Coursework should support the capstones– not exclusively, but to a fair degree: Advisors should take this into account when recommending coursework to first and second-year students.  What will the interdisciplinary field possibly be, and has the student taken a seminar in that field?  What other-than intellectual and cultural history field does the student wish to pursue (and has the advisor discussed historical fields with the student)?

8. Per CSGS Regulation Section V.2, professors are not available during the summer months to discuss and read capstone essays.  The same holds true for dissertations and research tutorials.  This time is reserved for their own scholarship and most professors hold 9-month contracts. Exceptions may be permitted by individual professors and for hardship cases.  But students should be aware of the general rule when preparing their capstone petition. 

  • The following narrative guidance from a previous edition of the Handbook aligns with the above procedures and provides useful insights into the nuts and bolts.

All doctoral students are required to write three capstone essays in the third year of their graduate studies.  For each of these essays, the student will master, summarize, and criticize a body of historical literature.  The essays should address the following three fields:

Field 1: Intellectual and cultural history.

Field 2: A specialized field in history other than intellectual/cultural history. Examples include political history, diplomatic history, disability history, social history, or any other subfield supported by the teaching and research expertise of the History and Culture faculty.

Field 3: An interdisciplinary field that explores the intersections between history and another discipline, such as literary studies, classics, anthropology, political science, sociology, art history, or economics.

                You don’t have to reach a hard and fast decision about your three fields in your first semester of coursework, but you should begin to think about them.  In consultation with your faculty advisor, plan your course selections with your future capstone essays in mind.  You should take at least two courses covering each field.

                More serious planning should begin early in your final semester of coursework.  Sit down with your faculty advisor and the Director to plan out your three fields.  Select a First Reader and Second Reader for each field – and make sure they are agreeable to working with you.  (Faculty based at other universities may serve as readers.)  Print the Capstone Essays petition from http://www.drew.edu/graduate/deans-office/forms ), fill it out, and send it to the program director for approval.  Once it is approved by the director and the Committee on Academic Standing, you are ready to begin your readings.  Make sure the approval process is completed before the end of the semester: then, once you have finished all your course work, you can start immediately on your capstone essays, and make productive use of your summer.

                Meet individually with all three of your first readers, who will help you plan out your reading lists.  The list for each essay should run to 30-40 books or the equivalent in articles, all secondary works rather than primary texts.  (We assume that you have covered essential primary sources in your coursework.)  The final essay itself should be 30-40 pp. of text, plus a complete bibliography.  While you are reading and writing, you should meet occasionally with your readers to discuss your work and thrash out ideas.

                How broad an area should each essay cover?  Obviously it should be focused, but not as specialized as a dissertation topic.  The point of this exercise is to demonstrate to potential employer that you are prepared to teach in certain areas, so your subject should be a plausible title for a college course.  For example, you obviously can’t cover the whole field of cultural history, nor should you limit yourself to the French response to Jerry Lewis, but an essay on modern French cultural history would be about right. 

                Each essay should survey and criticize recent work in a given historiographical subfield.  What important trends do you see?  Which questions are scholars addressing – or overlooking?  What methodologies and  sources are they using – or ignoring?  What debates are they engaged in, and what is their state of play?  Which assumptions are they sharing – or overturning Are historians breaking genuinely new ground or are they stuck in the past?  Where are they located ideologically?  What should they be doing that they aren’t doing?  Do some of these trends cut across subfields?  Have the boundaries between subfields (social/intellectual/cultural/military/medical/political history etc.) become blurred as specialists in these fields borrow from each other?  Convey some sense of how this subfield has developed over time.  Conclude with suggestions for future research.

                You should not write 40 one-page reviews of 40 books strung together.  You should focus on issues, and bring particular readings into the discussion whenever they are relevant to those issues.  That means you may have to discuss a book in one context and then, several pages later, return to it in another context.  You may decide that some books merit extended discussion, others deserve only a brief mention, and still others are irrelevant to your discussion and should be replaced with other books.

                You should touch on most (though not necessarily all) of the works on your reading list.  Your bibliography should include all the works you read, whether or not you actually discussed them.  The essay should be properly footnoted, following Chicago or MLA style.

                Completed essays should be e-mailed to the Caspersen School office (jmontros@drew.edu) , who will forward them to your first and second Readers.  They can assign one of three grades: Qualified with Distinction (QD), Qualified (Q), or Not Qualified (NQ).  You need at least two Q grades to pass.   If your essay does not receive a passing grade from either Reader, you can revise and resubmit, but be sure to consult first with your First and Second Readers.  (Readers normally do not write comments on capstone essays.)  All three capstone essays must be satisfactorily completed by the end of the third year of study (for full-time students) or within two years of the completion of course work (for part-time students).

The Dissertation Prospectus

       Toward the end of the third year each student will select a dissertation committee consisting of three faculty, one of whom may be based at another university. The student should file a Dissertation Committee Form with the Caspersen School office and then  draft a prospectus. (The form and the prospectus cover sheet will be found at http://www.drew.edu/graduate/deans-office/forms.)  All three members of the dissertation committee must approve the prospectus.Before the committee approves the prospectus, the student must have at least one face-to-face meeting with all members of the committee (exceptions may be allowed for non-Drew faculty).

The prospectus should be a detailed ten-page research plan plus a bibliography.  It should be structured in five sections:

State your thesis and explain its importance.

Review prior scholarship on this subject.

Explain your methodology and the new and distinctive contribution that your dissertation will make.

Chapter outline.

Bibliography, with separate sections for primary and secondary sources.

Student Teaching

          In both semesters of their second year, Fellows are required to serve as teaching assistants in history or history-related survey courses at Drew University.  There may also be a limited number of teaching assistantships for other doctoral students, who will receive a modest stipend.  Teaching assistants will be assigned to appropriate courses by the Convenor.

            All first-time teaching assistants are required to attend a series of pedagogical workshops cosponsored by the Graduate Division of Religion and the History and Culture program.  These workshops, which offer valuable teacher training, may also have openings for a limited number of other graduate students.

          This Requirement is Under Review and therefore suspended for 2016-17: All Fellows are required to teach one undergraduate course at a local college in each semester of their third year.  This is also recommended (but not required) for other third-year doctoral students.  Any adjunct salary that Fellows receive will be returned to Drew University;  other students will keep their salaries.  Teaching more than one course per semester is prohibited for Fellows and discouraged for other students.  At the beginning of your final semester of coursework, you should supply the Associate Dean with a CV and ask him to arrange teaching assignments at local colleges for the following year. 

            Foreign students may have visas that limit their opportunities to work off-campus.  They can secure off-campus work authorization for adjunct teaching by registering for INTG 900, a one credit course. Forms and further information can be obtained from the Associate Dean.  At the end of their teaching semester, adjunct instructors should report back to the Associate Dean, who will enter a grade of S for them.

The Dean Hopper New Scholars Conference

            In September, the Convenor will convene a planning meeting for our annual Dean Hopper New Scholars Conference.  (The first such conference was held in June 2013.)  Participation in this conference is mandatory for all third-year doctoral students and optional for all other Drew graduate students.  Except for one or two keynotes by senior scholars, all the papers at this conference will be presented by graduate students or new PhDs.  A faculty advisor will offer general guidance, but beyond that the third-year students will be responsible for all aspects of the conference: selecting the theme, drafting and disseminating the call for papers, selecting the papers to be presented from among the abstracts submitted, recruiting the keynoters, publicizing the conference, and arranging all the logistics.  The conference will be held the following May or June, after Commencement.

Construct a Calendar

            As you can see, you have a lot to do, with only one fixed deadline: everything must be finished by the end of the third year.  You don’t want to drift along until April and then hurriedly attempt to pull everything together at the last minute.  Therefore, at the end of your second year, sit down with your faculty advisor and draft a calendar for the coming year, laying down self-imposed deadlines for each of the tasks outlined above.  Since you will inevitably miss some of these intermediate deadlines, build some slack into your schedule.  And meet with your faculty advisor at least once a month, just to ensure that you’re on track.  In past years third-year students have found it helpful to organize a support group for mutual encouragement and socializing.

 

 

Caspersen School of Graduate Studies

Drew University

GUIDELINES FOR THE PREPARATION OF DOCTORAL DISSERTATIONS

Study Guidelines

Dissertations submitted to the Caspersen School must conform to the latest edition of either Kate L. Turabian’s A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (New York: The Modern Language Association of America) or APA,  Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

Do not use dissertations in the library as style guides.

Before writing even one word of your rough draft, read the style manual thoroughly and follow it scrupulously as you write your rough draft.

Note especially the chapters on “Preparing the List of Works Cited” and “Documenting Sources”

Before writing one word of your rough draft, set up your document with the correct margins, tab stops (for indentations of paragraphs, block quotations, and footnotes), and pagination. From the beginning use the proper headings, subheadings, footnotes, and bibliography entries. Then you will have a very clear picture of where you are as you go along, and you will save an enormous amount of cleanup time at the end because making these changes afterward to the correct settings is very time consuming.

The following regulations should be observed. In case of any conflict these supersede all three style guides.

Structure of the Dissertation

The dissertation shall always contain the following items: title page, table of contents, the text, appropriate footnotes, and a bibliography, either simple or annotated.

Optional items include: a dedication page, a preface, and appropriate tables, charts, and figures.

Preparing the Submission Copies of the Dissertation

Type sizes and faces:

Acceptable:

New Times Roman or the equivalent

12 point font for main text; no less than 10 point for footnotes

Unacceptable:      

Type faces smaller than 12 points

Fonts that are compressed and that squeeze in as many letters as possible on a line.

 

Contact the Administrative Assistant in the CSGS early on in your writing process. She will refer you to someone who can check the format of your manuscript.

Some formatting guidelines:

Page and text format:

Margins

Left: one and a half inches

Right: one inch

Top: one inch

Bottom: an inch to an inch and a quarter below the last footnote line.

Pagination: is inside the above margins.

For the text: In the upper right corner, except for the first page of a chapter (bottom center).

Front matter (everything before the first page of your text): Page numbers for this section are small Roman numerals and are placed at the bottom center of the page.

Footnotes must follow the proper formats and be placed at the bottom of the page, not at the end of the chapter or of the dissertation.

In other format matters—eg, table of contents, bibliography, chapter headings, subheadings—follow the guidelines in the style handbook you are using.

Line Spacing: All text: either double-space or space-and-a-half. Block quotations, footnotes, and bibliography items: single space.

Typing Conventions:

Spacing after periods:

After initials use one space: T. D. , not T.D.

In abbreviations, no spaces are used: U.S.A. Ph.D.

Periods and commas always go inside the quotation marks in American style, no exceptions                  

end of quotation.” - Is correct

Not, end of quotation”. - Is incorrect

Dashes are made with two hyphens and no spaces:

Text—text (the 2 dashes become a longer, solid line)

Not, text – text

After the colon

In text: two spaces

In bibliographies and footnotes use one space:

Book title: subtitle

City: publisher

Quotations:

Shorter than 50 words:

Integrate with your sentence and set off by double quotation marks (“”).

If you are using citations in the text instead of using footnotes, put the citation inside the period of the sentence but after the end of the quotation:

last word of the quotation” (Wrenn 165).

Not, last word of the quotation.” (Wrenn 165)

Longer than 50 words:

Put in block form i.e., indented on the left only and usually single spaced (MLA double spaced).

The block form is the equivalent of “” so do not use “” unless the original quotation has them. 

Ellipsis:

This is one of the most frequent problems. The purpose of the ellipsis is to show than an omission has been make in the quotation. The form of the ellipsis indicates the type of omission. The number and spacing of the periods has meaning. When the omission is obvious, an ellipsis is not necessary. Note the following examples and what they mean.

 

text…text

Something is left out of the middle of the sentence.

text…Text [Turabian]  text… Text [MLA]

The end of a sentence is left out and a new sentence starts. Turabian uses one space after the final period. MLA uses two spaces after the final period on the logic that two spaces follow the end of a sentence.

text…Text [Turabian]  text… Text [MLA]

One sentence ends, an omission is made, and a new sentence begins.

text…[T]ext

One sentence ends, on omission is made, and a new sentence begins, but not at the beginning. The first word of a sentence must be capitalized, but since that word is not capitalized in the original, the capital is put in [ ].

4.         Submitting copies of the dissertation for the oral defense:

If your reader has approved, an electronic file of your dissertation defense copies may be submitted to your readers . However, if your reader/s prefer a hard copy then you may print doubled sided copies and put in three ringbinder for easy handling.

Include an abstract of not more than 350 words for each reader’s review. Follow format heading sample (p. 7).

At the same time you have submitted your dissertation to your readers, submit a title page, vita and abstract to the Administrative Assistant to the CSGS Dean’s office.

5.         Submitting the final copy after the oral defense:

Compile all corrections and changes required by the readers, make the appropriate changes in your text, and submit the final PDF copy online per instructions from the Caspersen School.

ProQuest Data Base: Drew recommends the traditional publishing and is free.

The fee for copyrighting may range between $30 and $40.  This fee is paid on line.

 

Front matter

 Title page format, (page 5):

Double-space between all lines.

Margins: Top—1.5 to 2 inches; bottom—1 to 1¼ inches; left—1½ inches;

right—1 inch.

For titles that take more than one line, if possible use the inverted pyramid style, and center each line and double space between the lines.  There should be no more than 45 characters, including spaces, on any one line of the title.

 

 Abstract Format, (page 7):

Double-space the text of your abstract.

Margins: One and half inch on the left, then one inch at the top, right and bottom. A copy of the abstract will be included in the final online submission of the dissertation.  The placement follows the copyright page—pages are counted as part of the front matter although the numbers are not printed. (See the front matter sample packet.)

Should be dated the month and year when you degree is conferred.

 

Back Matter

The Vita, (Page 8)

 Include degrees from each institution.

The last entry should be your forthcoming degree from Drew University

The Vita form is the last page of your dissertation when you are ready to upload it into Proquest.

Should be dated the month and year when you degree is conferred.

 

Instructions for Submission of Dissertations and Thesis as of May 2015

Drew University has changed over to electronic submission of Dissertations and Theses.  If you have read the regulations or previous guidelines concerning the administrative process in submitting your documents, you will note that those instructions are geared towards hard copy submission of first draft, revisions and final manuscript.    These instructions supersede those available on line and in any regulations handbook and will be incorporated in the next revision of those manuals and handouts.

The defense draft of a dissertation and thesis is due to the committee on March 2nd.  When you submit your document to your reader, it can be an electronic file or hard copy.    This is determined by the reader’s preference.  In either scenario, please send an email to the Dean’s office (jmontros@drew.edu) with a copy to each reader indicating that the draft was submitted.  For dissertations, you should attach an electronic copy of your abstract, title page with chair’s name on it and a VITA.   For a thesis, a title page and VITA will be required.  These should all be typed in electronic format (no hand written forms) as you will need them later for the final submission.

Once the Dean’s office is notified, ballots will be sent to the dissertation committee.  The committee will officially determine if the student is ready for oral defense by sending in signed ballots.  Once it has been determined that the student is ready to defend, the student can arrange the date for the defense with the committee.  The Dean’s office will make arrangements for the room.  Contact Joanne at 973-408-3611. For a student writing a thesis, your reader will provide informal updates on your progress to the Dean’s office in order to determine eligibility to graduate.  A thesis advisor should notify the Dean’s office via email when the student’s final grade has been posted.

On the day of the defense, an oral exam certificate will be given to the committee to judge the dissertation and indicate if the student has qualified.  On April 24th, the final copy of the dissertation or thesis with all revisions must be submitted to the on line system. Your manuscript should be reviewed by Linda Blank prior to that date.  Contact Linda at lindablank18@gmail.com or lblank@drew.edu for correct format before you submit it to Proquest or Drew’s system.

 Here is the link to Library and ultimately Proquest:  http://walter.drew.edu/etd/

There is no need to bring copies of your manuscript to the CSGS Dean’s office unless you want the Dean’s office to facilitate delivering it to your reader.

It is not necessary to submit multiple copies of the abstract on paper.

Do not buy any special paper because regular copy paper can be used for the drafts.

For dissertations, there is no need to write a check out to Drew because you will pay directly to Proquest with a credit card and can order personal copies at that time. 

The file you will be uploading should be in a pdf format and must be one document.

The Vita form is the last page of the document.

Abstracts and Vita should be dated May 2015. This is the month and year the Registrar will confer your degree.

Send release form to me before you upload the document to Proquest.  Sign and scan then Email jmontros@drew.edu, or fax to 973-408-3040 or mail hard copy via US Post Office.

The address is:

 Drew University - CSGS

36 Madison Ave Room 126

Madison, NJ 07940

Document will not be approved if the release has not been signed and submitted to Dean’s office.